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Umer Ahmad
16-05-2015, 13:26
I see a lot of people spinning out and I believe strongly the Limited Slip Differentials (LSD) units or known more simply as "diffs" are working against you guys and not in your favor.

Here's my rule of thumb how to tune diffs.

IF you are spinning ENTERING the corner (or coming off heavy braking into the corner) then INCREASE (slide right) the DECEL diff setting. Increasing the DECEL will gain you stability while sacrificing some turning ability (but since you already are turning too much i think that's a trade-off well worth it).

IF you are spinning EXITING the corner (on throttle/power) then REDUCE (slide left) the ACCEL diff setting. Same reasoning, more "safety" and less turning ability.


Start with these two, I'll talk about PRELOAD and VISCOUS later.

Rapster
16-05-2015, 14:20
Start talking about PRELOAD and VISCOUS!

Please.... ;)

I wasn't having much fun with the McLaren F1 (TCS Off) until I started adjusting the ACCEL/DECEL diffs, so an explanation, with examples, of the other two settings would be wonderful!

Pervasive
16-05-2015, 17:23
I was hoping this would help the default setting of the Clio. That thing was making me so angry last night. I had to jump in another car to end my night off correctly. (Xbox-pad)

Can't wait to see more. But I was thinking I'm going to pay more attention to this

JeyD02
16-05-2015, 18:50
Start talking about PRELOAD and VISCOUS!

Please.... ;)

I wasn't having much fun with the McLaren F1 (TCS Off) until I started adjusting the ACCEL/DECEL diffs, so an explanation, with examples, of the other two settings would be wonderful!

The preload is basically the transitioning weight being carried from back to front or visa versa only when accelerating then break or breaking the accelerating.

If you feel the that there is too much responsiveness or nervousness of car when breaking/accelerating then DECREASE IT, if weigh feels dead, or no responsive enough then INCREASE preload.

Manic DBB
16-05-2015, 20:28
Start talking about PRELOAD and VISCOUS!

Please.... ;)

I wasn't having much fun with the McLaren F1 (TCS Off) until I started adjusting the ACCEL/DECEL diffs, so an explanation, with examples, of the other two settings would be wonderful!Yeah the McLaren will spin right out if you don't blip the throttle, and even then it's tricky. Not sure if the default diff setting is correct, having never driven an F1, but I am getting some practice with the heel-toe technique.

ford_racer
17-05-2015, 00:04
I was hoping this would help the default setting of the Clio. That thing was making me so angry last night. I had to jump in another car to end my night off correctly. (Xbox-pad)

Can't wait to see more. But I was thinking I'm going to pay more attention to this

I assume you are having a lot of lift off oversteer with the Clio like I was. If so, diff tuning isn't going to do much for you. It'll help a bit, but you need to get more grip into the rear tires. And seeing as the car is FWD, diff tuning can only do so much by tightening up the front.

Shepard2603
18-05-2015, 06:50
I was hoping this would help the default setting of the Clio. That thing was making me so angry last night. I had to jump in another car to end my night off correctly. (Xbox-pad)

Can't wait to see more. But I was thinking I'm going to pay more attention to this
Yeah that tiny little Clio-Basta** also got me upset easily. My workaround for the oversteer is simple as that: hit the gas as soon as the car looses grip on the rear. Let 'dem front wheels do their work! :cool: It's a spin saver in 90%, at least for me.

Rift Racer
18-05-2015, 13:44
Yeah that tiny little Clio-Basta** also got me upset easily. My workaround for the oversteer is simple as that: hit the gas as soon as the car looses grip on the rear. Let 'dem front wheels do their work! :cool: It's a spin saver in 90%, at least for me.

Yup, that's pretty much how to handle oversteer in any FWD, usually sorts it right out :)

Dub Style CH
01-03-2016, 22:55
Yeah that tiny little Clio-Basta** also got me upset easily. My workaround for the oversteer is simple as that: hit the gas as soon as the car looses grip on the rear. Let 'dem front wheels do their work! :cool: It's a spin saver in 90%, at least for me.

yeah defo this helps. but its a pitA when doing long races and you have to look at your tire wear

AbeWoz
07-03-2016, 13:40
any help w/ preload and viscous lock?

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
07-03-2016, 16:09
Preload increases both dec and acc behavior at the same time. You can try the Falcon V8 Supercar to see what extreme amounts of preload will get you.

Viscous is a hydraulic lock that's based on the difference in wheelspeed between the left and right sides instead of the torque coming from the engine. Viscous will start transmitting torque to the other side AFTER a wheel starts spinning faster. So viscous will always need some amount of slip before it starts exhibiting locking behavior. It's generally a smooth way to get locking, but it doesn't prevent wheelspin, just reduces it. It also doesn't usually cause the excessive stability changes that high amounts of acc and dec can cause because it doesn't apply any locking until something is already slipping.

hkraft300
09-03-2016, 09:48
Can viscous be used then to smooth out the locking behaviour to prevent sudden changes?

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
09-03-2016, 10:11
Can viscous be used then to smooth out the locking behaviour to prevent sudden changes?Hmmm, don't really think so, at least if you mean sudden changes between other locking states.

The issue here is that acc and dec lock operate on the torque coming from the engine. So anytime you try to put any power down you engage the acc side and any time there's engine braking you engage the dec side. If you stand on the clutch so that no torque is coming from the engine you don't get either acc or dec locking, but you do still get preload. So with acc and dec you get locking depending on what the engine is doing, even if you don't have any slip at all at the moment.

Viscous on the other hand doesn't care about the engine, viscous only cares about the speed difference between the left and right side. You MUST have wheelspin to get viscous to activate (or well technically you just need a speed difference, so cornering causes a bit of it). So if you used viscous to try and smooth things over between acc and dec you'd need to be getting wheelspin during that change. I'm not that sure it's something that you'd really be able to utilize that much.

DrOrange95
11-03-2016, 16:07
Thank you so much! This helps me a great deal!

(I have a racing wheel, but no mount, so I'm constantly battling accidental over-steer exiting corners since the wheel is resting on my lap)

bigdaddyx2005
11-03-2016, 17:41
I see a lot of people spinning out and I believe strongly the Limited Slip Differentials (LSD) units or known more simply as "diffs" are working against you guys and not in your favor.

Here's my rule of thumb how to tune diffs.

IF you are spinning ENTERING the corner (or coming off heavy braking into the corner) then INCREASE (slide right) the DECEL diff setting. Increasing the DECEL will gain you stability while sacrificing some turning ability (but since you already are turning too much i think that's a trade-off well worth it).

IF you are spinning EXITING the corner (on throttle/power) then REDUCE (slide left) the ACCEL diff setting. Same reasoning, more "safety" and less turning ability.


Start with these two, I'll talk about PRELOAD and VISCOUS later.


so you are saying if I'm spinning coming off turns when I'm going back into the throttle I should lower the accel? like take it to the left which means if I had it at 30% then put it at 20%.. I thought the higher it was the less wheel spin. I know decal helps in corner braking.

Umer Ahmad
11-03-2016, 17:45
^correct. Try it out.

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
11-03-2016, 17:56
I thought the higher it was the less wheel spin. I know decal helps in corner braking.Less wheelspin in a SINGLE wheel. Higher acc lock prevents the driven wheel on the inside of the corner from spinning, but that wheel spinning isn't what causes oversteer. If you prevent that from spinning it means you're sending more to the other wheel, which will cause a yaw effect on the car (imagine if you only had the left tyre powered, it would really want to yank the car to the right), and also because you're sending extra torque to that wheel it means that you're more likely to get wheelspin there as well.

So low acc lock allows the inside wheel to spin more freely, but that doesn't want to rotate the car around, it'll just spin that one tyre faster. With low acc lock if you get wheelspin you at least only get it in one wheel. With high acc lock you'll get it with both wheels, which is a really good way to lose the rear, and even before you're getting wheelspin you're putting extra torque to the outside, causing yaw that wants to rotate your car more.

DisagioAbbestia
11-03-2016, 17:59
...and viceversa, if I spin after I leave the brake pedal entering the curve, I must increase my DECELERATION diff (I've setted to 55%). correct?

Umer Ahmad
11-03-2016, 19:02
^you got it.


With high acc lock you'll get it with both wheels, which is a really good way to lose the rear, and even before you're getting wheelspin you're putting extra torque to the outside, causing yaw that wants to rotate your car more.

^this. That is what is causing MOST players to spin out under throttle exiting corners. Both wheels are locked and spinning in a low grip situation and causing the whole rear of the (RWD) car to go sideways.

Thomas Sikora
11-03-2016, 20:18
I see a lot of people spinning out and I believe strongly the Limited Slip Differentials (LSD) units or known more simply as "diffs" are working against you guys and not in your favor.



easy and nice explaind Umer, but maybe few notes what also can cause this behavior. The diff is only a part of it.
I personaly starts very late with the diff settings and try to have as start/target value about 30-40% acc and very very low decceleration settings lower then 25 % also low preload, every increase of diff settings lower your maneuverability, if the other settings can't be improved then i tuch the diff

reasons for Entry oversteer (tight/slow corners after braking at turn in):
- to much castor angle
- to low slow rear rebound or to extrem high rear rebound (>>100% critical damping)
- to low rear slow bump
- brake bias to much to rear
- weight distrubution to much to front
- to low toe in at rear or to high toe out on front

reasons for Exit oversteer:
- to strong rear springs
- to high slow bump at rear
- to high front slow rebound
- to much weight bias to front
- rear much higher then front
- to low downforce at rear (if it is at high speed corners)

Umer Ahmad
11-03-2016, 20:54
^always good to hear more opinions.

I can tell you the team is going to be investigating the Differentials behavior/code in pCARS2 as they suspect it is having more influence on the car behavior than they like and perhaps the STM tyre model is having to "compensate" for some of the differential behavior.

hkraft300
12-03-2016, 00:10
^always good to hear more opinions.

I can tell you the team is going to be investigating the Differentials behavior/code in pCARS2 as they suspect it is having more influence on the car behavior than they like and perhaps the STM tyre model is having to "compensate" for some of the differential behavior.

But... But the car turns on a dime when you get the diff dialled just right and nail the exit...

Accel diff adjustment will help kerb riding behaviour too with nasty ones like Nur/Nord's Hock Classic.

Thomas Sikora
12-03-2016, 16:27
^always good to hear more opinions.

I can tell you the team is going to be investigating the Differentials behavior/code in pCARS2 as they suspect it is having more influence on the car behavior than they like and perhaps the STM tyre model is having to "compensate" for some of the differential behavior.

ohhaa :confused:
is there more details aviable, what expectations are not such like they want? :)

Umer Ahmad
12-03-2016, 19:09
http://pcars2.wmdportal.com/showthread.php?23999-Build-159-Tire-Test-Feedback&p=924063&viewfull=1#post924063

BigDad
13-03-2016, 13:07
http://pcars2.wmdportal.com/showthread.php?23999-Build-159-Tire-Test-Feedback&p=924063&viewfull=1#post924063
Have you got a user name and password we can use to have a read ? lol .

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
13-03-2016, 14:38
It's essentially just about the fact that when doing a realtime simulation of a differential there are some simplifications one must make, and some of them can be causing them to behave a bit less than optimally. It's something that every sim has to deal with somewhat, in different ways. For pCARS 2 they're working on improving that, as they are working on improving everything else as well.

havocc
21-06-2016, 14:39
Bump, how would you tune LMP2 differential for hockenheim gp? (not classic) :rolleyes:

Schnizz58
21-06-2016, 14:51
Same as anywhere else, havocc. Accel lock as high as possible without causing (too much) power oversteer on exit and Decel lock as low as possible without the car being unstable on corner entry. Preload as low as possible without losing the rear end in mid-corner. Personally I like a little bit of oversteer on exit because I can rotate the car faster that way, but ymmv.

Thomas Sikora
21-06-2016, 14:56
Bump, how would you tune LMP2 differential for hockenheim gp? (not classic) :rolleyes:

combination of slow, medium and highspeed corners :D
Not easy, more extrem difficult here because i'm other opinion as Schnizz, IMO its depends beside the track layout also on your grip balance/brake balance/aero balance.

My setup focus (1:30 time :D )
Medium ACC setting 25-40 for good exit acceleration out of slow/medium corners
Low to Medium DCC settings 20-30 because you have no corners were you have to brake deep inside but you have corners with much longitudinal weight transfere were you could get light rear
Medium Preload (60-100) for the Infield in Hockenheim were you have much load transfere
But as i said...this depends on your "global" car balance.

SenorPez
27-06-2016, 14:55
Okay, question that I'll couch in an example, because I'm really struggling with a particular setup*.

I'm experiencing too much oversteer powering out of corners. Common problem. Tires are at temperature, slicks, fairly smooth track.

To combat this, I can adjust a few things:

Soften the front damper rebound. More weight transfer under acceleration translates to more mechanical grip.
Soften the rear damper compression. Again, more weight transfer under acceleration translates to more mechanical grip.
Reduce the acceleration differential lock. Allows the wheels to spin more freely.


The question, then, that I feel stupid for asking, is what's the difference between these adjustments. I understand they affect different car components, but they all have the same result. Should one be prioritized over another? Are there "additional" side effects that these adjustments have that I should watch out for?

My "gut" tells me that I should start with the dampers, since that'll have a bigger effect on all corners (mechanical grip is always something I've struggled to find), but I don't neccessarily trust my gut.

--
* Yes, yes, I know I could just grab a setup from the database, but where's the fun in that... as I've said before, I used to be good at tuning (GT-era), but physics models passed me by during my years of not-playing-racing-games.

Schnizz58
27-06-2016, 15:15
Is this a general problem with any car or with a specific car? If so, what car and what are your diff settings?

SenorPez
27-06-2016, 16:51
Is this a general problem with any car or with a specific car? If so, what car and what are your diff settings?

The specific car I'm trying to dial in right now is the Ford Zakspeed Capri (really close now, in fact), but my question is really a more general one. There's a variety of ways to solve corner exit oversteer; when are techniques such as adjusting springs and dampers preferred to adjusting diffs, and vice versa?

Schnizz58
27-06-2016, 17:09
It's a good question but I don't think I have the knowledge to fully answer it. My first instinct is to go straight for the accel diff setting but that might not be optimal. There are other options as well such as springs and roll bars.

hkraft300
27-06-2016, 17:48
The damper changes you suggest I think is a much more subtle approach where the diff will be much more pronounced and possibly detrimental in some corners, if it is only a particular few corners you're experiencing the problem.
The damper changes won't affect the ultimate amount of weight transfer, but it will affect the rate at which the weight shifts. Correct me if I'm wrong, it could possibly make the exit oversteer gradual/predictable enough that you can feel it comes on and then control it.
Get the accel diff lock %-age just right, in combination with damping and springs, and the car will rotate nicely from the apex out.

Xraider
28-06-2016, 08:40
Okay, question that I'll couch in an example, because I'm really struggling with a particular setup*.

I'm experiencing too much oversteer powering out of corners. Common problem. Tires are at temperature, slicks, fairly smooth track.

To combat this, I can adjust a few things:

Soften the front damper rebound. More weight transfer under acceleration translates to more mechanical grip.
Soften the rear damper compression. Again, more weight transfer under acceleration translates to more mechanical grip.
Reduce the acceleration differential lock. Allows the wheels to spin more freely.


The question, then, that I feel stupid for asking, is what's the difference between these adjustments. I understand they affect different car components, but they all have the same result. Should one be prioritized over another? Are there "additional" side effects that these adjustments have that I should watch out for?

My "gut" tells me that I should start with the dampers, since that'll have a bigger effect on all corners (mechanical grip is always something I've struggled to find), but I don't neccessarily trust my gut.

--
* Yes, yes, I know I could just grab a setup from the database, but where's the fun in that... as I've said before, I used to be good at tuning (GT-era), but physics models passed me by during my years of not-playing-racing-games.

Hi, I'll give this a shot and keep it as simple as possible. As others have said, it's not a stupid or easy question.

First, let's fix some of your bullet points.

Combat Oversteer:

Soften the front damper rebound => Less Front Grip
Soften the rear damper compression => More Rear Grip
Reduce the acceleration differential lock. => Allows the wheels to spin more freely


Why did I change what you wrote? Think about the car tilting back on acceleration. Front Rises a bit from ground, Rear plants itself firmer into ground. Your front won't return to being firmly planted until the Acceleration rate drops off (near gear shift).
(Less Front Grip AND More Rear Grip => Understeer Increased)
Note that if this is done to an extreme, your car won't respond to your steering inputs (Front is kind of in air) until it stabilizes the body. You might not notice this straight away, and overcorrect...causing a spin which feels like massive oversteer.

Now, going back to the general question of what to do first. This is my approach (going to look complex). (assuming other basics like body bias/tire pressures are done)

1. Springs - They have a frequency. Soft means slow response, but committed. Tight means fast response, but ready to change at a moments notice. I get this part right first. Front spring on corner entry and general steering input from Slow to Medium areas (Fast is front wing). Rear spring on corner exit and general bumps (watch for planting itself too much taking input away from front/hitting the road on hills/kerbs). Most importantly though, I match my driving response time to the frequency of the spring. If I feel the car is listening too every single micro adjustment steering, I soften front.

2. Accel Lock/Dec Lock/Pre load(Pre-load after swaybar) -
Before I get into this. I ALWAYS mess with Accel/dec lock if I have spinouts on corner exit/corner entry. If spinouts are rare, it's a bit of a toss up between swaybar and this.
For maximum performance you want (Highest/Lowest/Lowest). For Acc, your wheels will spin at the same rate, but your inner turn wheels will lose grip and introduce power steer. So, if your car has turbo/lots of torque and/or is light/subpar grip...this is danger. So, to be safe you'll do the opposite of what's max performance. Where's the sweet spot? I keep approaching safety (lowering acc) until I think either A. low chance of spinout or B. the problem is in the damper or C. in swaybar.

3. Swaybar/Anti-rollbar (Stops chassis tilting on turns) - So, this works on lateral Gs (the stronger the Gs, the more antiroll works). If you do a very fast chicane, you want a tight swaybar (high frequency just like spring => fast response; except unlike general spring, swaybar is about huge lateral G's...like apex hit or chicane swaying). If you do a large slow turn, you want a soft swaybar. Get this right for your track, balancing between how chicanes and slow turns feel. Also note, you can always use the front/rear balance to adjust understeer/oversteer in those lateral G areas.

What does this have to do with Accel Lock? Let's say it's a very soft swaybar (like having no swaybar)...you do fast strong right turn after a chicane. Since, there is no antiroll...your car body rolls/tilts left. You're done with that right turn, but you smash the throttle to go straight. Problem is...your chassis isn't straight yet...you hit gas early. Your rear left wheel suddenly gets tremendous grip. And boom, your car is turning right again and doing it hard with acceleration. You overcorrect, spin.
So, if your swaybar was tighter...you wouldn't have such a big chassis effect. But, let's say your slow turn/chicane balance (all lateral G-force heavy corners) feel great with your setting. Then, we need to get that chassis back to center gravity asap after whatever body roll it experiences - and that's the dampers.
Note: However, you could lower Acc lock further to reduce engine power headed to the left gripped wheel and direct it to the path of least resistance - the right wheel. This would stop that crazy oversteer further.

4. Dampers. I won't really get into these, look at my lotus 98t (http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?47902-Lotus-98T-Case-Study-Tune-Guide-on-Zolder) post for clarity. But, remember Dampers are all about sudden changes in the spring (Throttle/Brake/Hard Turn/Kerbs/Bumps)

4.1 Let's say you did your dampers and swaybars, but you still have a spin here and there or things feel a bit too much oversteer for your taste...then you go back to lower Accel Lock further.

Hope I cleared some things up. As you can see, the process is somewhat step by step (swaybar might compete with accel/dec locks), with lots of review and intervenes to older steps based on car feel. That's why great racers maintain a close relationship with their engineering team. Tuning is a never ending cycle. You only know when you're done tuning if you can no longer break your hot lap times or improve the consistency of lap times.

Bealdor
28-06-2016, 09:09
Not going to argue against your general setup advices Xraider, but


Now, let's consider a slow and big 90 Degree right turn. In order to make the turn properly...your outer wheels travel a longer distance than your inside wheels. Put another way, the outer wheel spins faster. Acceleration Differential Lock REDUCES how much one wheel can spin faster than another. So, if it says 0%...both wheels move at exactly the same speed...making turning VERY difficult.

AFAIK it's the other way around. When you set Acc Diff Lock to 100% both wheels are forced to spin at the same speed, which means that the inner wheel tends to lose grip more quickly and introduce power oversteer.

Xraider
28-06-2016, 09:54
Not going to argue against your general setup advices Xraider, but



AFAIK it's the other way around. When you set Acc Diff Lock to 100% both wheels are forced to spin at the same speed, which means that the inner wheel tends to lose grip more quickly and introduce power oversteer.

Hi! I'm glad you bring it up actually, because it troubled me a little conceptually.

I know in real life I've read the Acc Diff Lock to 100% forces both wheels to spin equally. Just assumed the game had it backwards, guess not. Hadn't realized that it's the inner wheel grip loss introducing that oversteer. Good to know!

Doesn't affect what I end up doing in the tune, but conceptually I was incorrect. Thanks for the correction.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Just read/watched some things. For those interested, these are very good:

First is the differential.

https://youtu.be/F40ZBDAG8-o

Then it's the limited slip lock.

https://youtu.be/WeLm7wHvdxQ

SenorPez
28-06-2016, 15:21
Thank you all for the great posts and discussion. It really helps my understanding of the situation that's occurring, especially Xraider's long post! The difference between reducing front grip and increasing rear grip, for example, is part of the dynamic that I was attempting to understand, especially when you consider the interaction with the differential changes, which affects the drive wheels, and the limits on tire grip.

Now, the challenge is to actually apply this... and be consistent enough in my laps to be able to feel the effects of the changes. That's a challenge too!

Xraider
29-06-2016, 08:44
Thank you all for the great posts and discussion. It really helps my understanding of the situation that's occurring, especially Xraider's long post! The difference between reducing front grip and increasing rear grip, for example, is part of the dynamic that I was attempting to understand, especially when you consider the interaction with the differential changes, which affects the drive wheels, and the limits on tire grip.

Now, the challenge is to actually apply this... and be consistent enough in my laps to be able to feel the effects of the changes. That's a challenge too!

Cheers mate. It's fun to write these. My suggestion is to use the insta-replay function lots. I do it after every spin on practice to see which wheel made smoke (i turn ffb off on my ps4 controller) or tilt/wheel lift.

Anyways, Happy Driving!

Aizcold
08-07-2016, 12:22
I've got a question for all you differential experts... How does all of the stuff discussed above differ between RWD and FWD cars? Am I correct in saying that a higher Acc Lock in a FWD car will generally increase understeer on corner exit, whereas it increases oversteer on corner exit for a RWD car?

And, more importantly, how do decel lock and pre load settings impact FWD cars differently than RDW cars?

Many thanks for an answer on this.

Xraider
10-07-2016, 02:39
Am I correct in saying that a higher Acc Lock in a FWD car will generally increase understeer on corner exit, whereas it increases oversteer on corner exit for a RWD car?

Yes, sir. Be warned, I'm not a car engineer nor expert. I did test drive the Clio to confirm, and have seen this reasoning confirmed in other guides.



And, more importantly, how do decel lock and pre load settings impact FWD cars differently than RDW cars?


Dec Lock And Pre-Load maxed/locked both create understeer for FWD/RWD. On the Clio, if you just put the Pre-Load to 0, you end up power sliding as your lose the rear. Allowing for an aggressive turn during neutral. You can make sure you don't lose the car by giving it a little gas if your angle to apex starts becoming dangerous. If it's too dangerous, you can A). raise back the pre-load or B). raise Brake mapping (not 100% sure why, but it works...I think it's doing what i describe...giving a bit of throttle to stabilize).

So, on a Clio I literally put all Differentials to 0 and get decent lap times on Road America(2:37:597). Everything else default, except tires. (plenty of space to push more, but confirms basics of differentials on fwd)

foxx76
11-07-2016, 06:47
Am I correct in saying that a higher Acc Lock in a FWD car will generally increase understeer on corner exit(...)
I spend most of my Project Cars time (over 200h) on driving Time Trials and testing different setups on Ford Focus RS and Renault Megane RS. I tried many mixed settings for diff and I have to say that higher acceleration lock HELPS in better cornering. I'm not sure about what part of corner I started to overcome better, but my times are best with very high settings. In Megane is almost always 100% (with non-editable Preload). In Focus usually around 80-90% (but with quite high preload settings). I've no experience in driving Renault Clio Cup.

P.S. Watch my lap times Project CARS PC Leaderboards - foxx76 (http://pcars.13ms.de/#/users/76561198016529208) I get no lower than 3rd in those two FWD cars.

Xraider
11-07-2016, 08:16
Foxx76 - I think it's your style of driving, from watching your hot lap at Brand's Hatch (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc5SGXuvIU4). It would seem you break before a turn, then force the weight to shift to front left on a right turn...then you throttle. So if the front wheels are Acc Locked 100%, then they'd both spin at equal speed...but the outside/front left wheel has the most weight and thus gets the most traction(springs/swaybars play into effect)...so car turns right. From the video I think I still see understeer on the acceleration into turning parts, without that weight shift technique. I think your driving style is overcoming the Acc Lock at 100%. Not so much that Acc Lock 100% doesn't create understeer. Just my opinion.

When in doubt, I'd probably follow the record holder tbh. Only reason I replied is because I think it's logical. Great driving btw Foxx76!

foxx76
11-07-2016, 10:19
(...)From the video I think I still see understeer on the acceleration into turning parts, without that weight shift technique. I think your driving style is overcoming the Acc Lock at 100%. Not so much that Acc Lock 100% doesn't create understeer.(...)
Thanks for analysis. You're right - there is still quite a lot understeer on the acceleration, but after many laps I realize that on lower AccLock I have to press gas pedal less just to stay in the line. On high values (near 100%) I can go almost full throttle and I'm still not going too wide. To make rear axle more oversteer and help front-end in cornering, I'm setting some negative toe to rear-end just enough not to lose traction under heavy braking.

Video you referring to was recorded an year ago on default differential settings. But my driving doesn't change a lot. It's more smoother now, that's all. My current record is almost 2,5 seconds quicker.