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IR STiGGLES
20-05-2015, 20:23
I was messing with a tune for the McClaren gt3 and noticed that according to the telemetry, no matter what I did with the camber either max or min that the left side tires kept a few degree spread from inside to outside and the right side tires did not change...I then tested the same on a FA car and noticed the same. Also visually the camber did not change.


Anyone else notice this?

Srt8 300c
20-05-2015, 20:37
Yes but by increasing the camber or decreasing the camber did you notice a positive/negative effect on lap times?

IR STiGGLES
20-05-2015, 20:48
Haven't gotten that far yet but I did max out the left side and zero out the right side on an FA car and it didn't seem to change much if anything

Srt8 300c
20-05-2015, 20:59
Very strange!! Ill do some testing too tomorrow.
Ive noticed there isnt much temp increase/decrease.....
Unless you have to do more than 12 laps.
Tbh i dont go past realistic limits 3.5 max front 3.0max rear ( generally 3.2 front between 1.9-2.4 rear, car depending)) but i will to test this. theory.

Srt8 300c
20-05-2015, 21:04
Im not questioning what your saying, i agree. Im intrigued to see if i can get the inners or outers hotter or colder substantially.
Also to see if it has a detrimental effect to lap times......
Ive never noticed this.........

IR STiGGLES
20-05-2015, 21:22
That's what I spent today doing. Now reinstalling incase it's a glitch haha

Umer Ahmad
20-05-2015, 21:24
It's not a glitch. This is an area we are investigating. You're not crazy.

IR STiGGLES
20-05-2015, 22:29
Thanks for the info. Sorry if it was a repeat topic

NVI0U5
21-05-2015, 02:03
how is your tire pressure, remember running a lower pressure wont have any effect on camber if the pressure is so it low its the same contact patch footprint, due excessive flex in the inner sidewall, when running higher pressure that is when it will be more noticeable having a rigid sidewall

IR STiGGLES
21-05-2015, 02:39
See post 7

Deadzone
21-05-2015, 02:49
I suspect that once these underlying tire issues are sorted it will fix a lot of other problems that come as a result of it.
Probably even feel like a new game.

MABlosfeld
05-10-2015, 15:19
270 hours running and only TODAY I know that CAMBER, CASTER, ANGLE DIVERGENT, SPRINGS does not work? It's a joke?

OpticalHercules
05-10-2015, 15:27
I notice that some tracks respond more to front camber and tire temps than others. Dubai GP anything over -1.5 front and you burn out your FL tire in 2-3 laps, while Sonoma GP doesn't matter if your <-1.5 or >-2.4 you'll still burn your tires out if you overdrive the car at all through the LH sweeper.

As far as driveability and camber, hop in the Formula A and raise your Rear Camber as high as it goes, then go out and try to do several low gear take-offs. Then go back and drop the Rear Camber to 0.0 and repeat the takeoffs. MUCH more stable with full contact patch on the rear wheels (as it should be). The differences are there for vehicle control, but for Tire Timp monitoring, I think the track has more impact than the actual angle does, specifically whether the more demanding turns are banked or flat. Dubai/Catalunya are flat and do respond to major camber changes, while Sonoma and Watkins Glen, mostly being banked, don't respond as much (temp wise)

I see Umer's post that it's being looked into, but personally I don't see all that much problem with how it is now. Just my personal opinion though.

OpticalHercules
05-10-2015, 15:28
270 hours running and only TODAY I know that CAMBER, CASTER, ANGLE DIVERGENT, SPRINGS does not work? It's a joke?

Caster DEFINITELY has an effect, Angle Divergent (Toe-In?) Most Definitely have effect, and Springs also have effect.

Umer Ahmad
05-10-2015, 15:30
Some R&D in-flight for Camber. Stay tuned. I dont expect a "game changing" effect, more of a minor correction.

MABlosfeld
05-10-2015, 17:17
Caster DEFINITELY has an effect, Angle Divergent (Toe-In?) Most Definitely have effect, and Springs also have effect.

maybe my settings file is broken
I changed CAMBER, CASTER, TOE-IN, TOE-OUT SPRING has no effect
maybe delete the settings file and start all over again solve the problem
How do I safely delete the file?

Roger Prynne
05-10-2015, 17:54
maybe my settings file is broken
I changed CAMBER, CASTER, TOE-IN, TOE-OUT SPRING has no effect
maybe delete the settings file and start all over again solve the problem
How do I safely delete the file?


Wherever Steam is installed\Steam\userdata\<your Steam ID>\234630\local\project cars\profiles\default.sav

You will loose all your Career progress though, so make a copy of it first, just in case you want to use it again.

Please let us know if it solved your problem.

MABlosfeld
05-10-2015, 22:03
You will loose all your Career progress though, so make a copy of it first, just in case you want to use it again.

Please let us know if it solved your problem.

I did some tests and apparently has not solved
I intend to do more tests
thanks for listening.

lollygag
05-10-2015, 22:37
270 hours running and only TODAY I know that CAMBER, CASTER, ANGLE DIVERGENT, SPRINGS does not work? It's a joke?


No, they all work.. camber as well.

MABlosfeld
05-10-2015, 23:36
No, they all work.. camber as well.

look here => http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?40043-Camber

Roger Prynne
06-10-2015, 00:14
^^^ Yeah but that proves it does work, just not correctly.

MABlosfeld was saying that it has no effect.


I changed CAMBER, CASTER, TOE-IN, TOE-OUT SPRING has no effect

OpticalHercules
06-10-2015, 17:02
maybe my settings file is broken
I changed CAMBER, CASTER, TOE-IN, TOE-OUT SPRING has no effect
maybe delete the settings file and start all over again solve the problem
How do I safely delete the file?

Camber is the hard one to quantify, but there is some small effect on tire temps depending on track (whether turns are mostly flat or banked), and there's also some effect on traction during high speed turns (front camber), traction during take-off/starts (rear camber), and how much braking is possible before losing traction (front and rear camber, depending on your brake balance settings).

Caster has some small effect on straight line stability at high speed (higher camber = more stability), but where I notice it the most is on turns post-apex and how much throttle you're able to apply in a high-powered car before the back end swings out. I notice on higher camber settings that I'm able to apply more throttle right after the turn-apex on GT3 or LMP1/2 cars and the back end stays right in line, where a lower camber setting I have to be more careful applying throttle after apex, however a lower setting allows the car to be more "nimble" during rapid turns, while higher settings can hurt on quick turns but improve stability on longer turns.

Toe In (front) has very noticeable effects on turns. Negative toe-in (-0.1, -0.2 etc) gives you much more strength while turning, less tendency to understeer through most of the turn. Positive Toe In (0.1, 0.2 etc) make the car much easier to "turn-in", meaning right when you start the turn the car has more of an oversteer feel that I find valuable on some tracks. Low toe-in settings (-0.1, 0.0, 0.1) also allow for better braking strength, while higher settings (-0.3, -0.2, 0.2, 0.3) hurts your braking ability, requiring longer braking distances and also increases your tire wear.

toe In (rear) affects your straight line stability and some effect on your acceleration and top speed. Low rear settings (-0.1, -0.2) cause the car to feel more "twitchy" when making minor corrections in a straight line at high speed but also allow the car to accelerate faster and gives less rolling resistance allowing you to reach top speed faster. Higher rear toe-in (-0.3, -0.4) increase stability when making minor steering corrections in a straight line at high speed, but also increase rolling resistance and slightly hurting your acceleration and requiring more power to let you reach top speed, and also increasing wear rate on the rear tires.

Schnizz58
06-10-2015, 18:41
You can also feel the effects of caster in the FFB. Higher caster settings make the car a little harder to turn but more stable. I hadn't noticed that it also helps with power oversteer but I'll give that a try. I recently went from Formula C to Formula B and there is a vast difference between those cars in terms of power. So I'm learning how not to spin out and that should help.

OpticalHercules
06-10-2015, 19:39
You can also feel the effects of caster in the FFB. Higher caster settings make the car a little harder to turn but more stable. I hadn't noticed that it also helps with power oversteer but I'll give that a try. I recently went from Formula C to Formula B and there is a vast difference between those cars in terms of power. So I'm learning how not to spin out and that should help.

It may not help with the actual application of power but rather in keeping the car in a more level plane post-apex allowing the drive wheels to maintain better contact. I definitely notice it on the Dunlop Curves of Circuit de la Sarthe (the banked left/right) and on the flat Right/Left/Right after radillion straight on Spa when using GT3 or LMP2 cars. Not quite as much effect on LMP1, but there's more downforce there, at least on my tunes. I've spent a lot of time in the past on F/C, but it's been quite a while and I don't recall how much effect Caster had on those cars. My biggest alignment adjustment on F/B or F/A was in the rear camber, dropping it to nothing to allow takeoffs without looping the car from a standstill.

Schnizz58
06-10-2015, 21:03
I've already got rear camber at 0 or whatever the lowest setting is. The corner I have the most trouble with right now (I'm sure there will be others in the future) is the one before the long back straight at Hockenheim. There's a 90 right and then a sweeping left that leads onto the straight. When I make that left, the rear wants to kick out as I get on the power. Adjusting the diff settings (reducing accel lock) has helped quite a bit but it still feels a bit loose there so I'm more cautious than I would like. Of course a lot of it is also me learning how to properly modulate the throttle. There haven't been many cars for me yet in this game that have that kind of power/weight ratio. F/A is going to be a LOT of fun when I get there. :)

ETA: I"m also trying to run with as little downforce as I can get away with.

MABlosfeld
06-10-2015, 21:06
front and rear downforce MAXIMUM
tire wear x7

219834219835219836

MABlosfeld
06-10-2015, 21:12
front and rear downforce MINIMUM
tire wear x7

219837219838219840

Dynomight Motorsports
07-10-2015, 00:34
Looks like Downforce also has no effect on the suspension, as so many pounds of downforce should compress the suspension more, hence the need for more Camber. Tire wear was better in some places, and worse in others the only improvement is in Lap time.

MABlosfeld
07-10-2015, 01:04
Looks like Downforce also has no effect on the suspension, as so many pounds of downforce should compress the suspension more, hence the need for more Camber. Tire wear was better in some places, and worse in others the only improvement is in Lap time.

MAXIMO downforce and TOE generates more friction and heating wearing tires
it seems MINIMUM / MAXIMUM generates the same wear and temperature

Umer Ahmad
07-10-2015, 02:23
Looks like Downforce also has no effect on the suspension, as so many pounds of downforce should compress the suspension more
cannot agree with this statement. Paging Dr. Jussi

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
07-10-2015, 02:54
cannot agree with this statement. Paging Dr. JussiFunnily enough I've been doing testing related EXACTLY to this with the GT3 cars. I've been working out methods of estimating the amounts of downforce the cars produce with different aerodynamic settings by measuring the differences in ride height and travel between stationary and 200 km/h, then applying that to the spring rates (adjusted for motion ratio). For the most part I'd say it's been a success, it's not perfectly accurate simply because we're working with only millimeter accuracy (which means the step sizes can be quite massive depending on the springs) and the data is a bit jittery (would LOVE for the ride height and travel to be output through the API so I could log them and run averages), but the results do seem to make sense, behave logically, and seem to relate to perceived and measurable car behavior. When I for example measured that the aerodynamic center of pressure was significantly in front of the weight distribution, the cars tended to become oversteery at high speeds, and when it was behind the cars became understeery, exactly as you'd expect.

So I know for a 100% certain fact that the downforce has a very big effect on the suspension, and that effect is predictable and logical. =)

Dynomight Motorsports
07-10-2015, 03:08
According to those pictures there is no extra compression of the suspension. You must have extra tools we do not have. I do know that Aero changes do impact the handling of the car, but if you simulate downforce with a car out in your driveway ie pushing down on the rear of the car as if a wing was generating downforce (say 200lbs), does it not compress the suspension??? I would think we would see different numbers in the above post Minimal DF vs Maximum DF. That's just my take. I do agree.. that the handling is affected, just doesn't show. Could be a game bug in the telemetry though, like the bump stops on LF.

**Just adding my Opinion from what I'm observing from the above evidence.

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
07-10-2015, 03:29
According to those pictures there is no extra compression of the suspension.Those two pictures are taken with the car standing still as well. You need to actually be going somewhere to get downforce, unless you have a fancar. =)

And no, I only have the in-game telemetry to help me with those specific tests. The best place to do them btw is the drag strip on the Mojave Test Track (it is almost perfectly flat, and we are talking about millimeters here). First drive to the drag strip staging area, check the ride heights/travel there, then go back to the high speed oval, go down it a bit, turn around again, and then try to get up to speed when hitting the drag strip, and hold your speed STEADY (any acceleration or deceleration will cause compression at the front or rear), and take screenshots. You will see a difference, some of the prototypes can even completely squash the travel and run on bump stops with high DF settings at high enough speeds.

Bealdor
07-10-2015, 06:58
According to those pictures there is no extra compression of the suspension.

As Jussi said, if you look closely you can see that the velocity of the car is 0 in both pictures. ;)

Dynomight Motorsports
07-10-2015, 10:39
I see..thanks for pointing that out! I was just looking for suspension travel, used to looking at the american version didn't notice the 0's at the top.. haha!

MABlosfeld
07-10-2015, 13:10
I stopped the car to take print screen
I will do further tests this time I will take print screen with the car moving at 280 kmh or 175 mph

SOME EFFECTS THAT SHOULD HAPPEN
1) to set maximum TOE (1.9)
- More friction on the tires with the surface
- More wear on the tires
- More heat in the tires
- Less speed
- Better driving straight

2) to set TOE minimum or zero (0.0)
- Less friction
- Less wear
- Less heat
- More speed
- Worst driving straight

3) to set maximum DOWNFORCE
- More aerodynamic pressure
- Less speed straight
- More grip when cornering
- More pressure on springs
- More pressure in the tires
- More wear on the tires
- More heat in the tires

4) to set DOWNFORCE minimum or zero
- Less aerodynamic pressure
- More speed straight
- Less grip when cornering
- Less pressure on springs
- Less tire pressure
- Less wear on the tires
- Less heat in the tires

219898

CAMBER
to make the turn, the left front wheel CONVERGENT suffers more outstrips, drag, grip, heating and wear the front left wheel DIVERGENT
It's the same for the opposite side (turn left, right support wheel)
CASTER
the larger the angle will be smaller tire contact surface with respect to the ground when cornering. In conjunction with the CAMBER and ALIGNMENT can take better advantage.

MABlosfeld
07-10-2015, 15:05
219907

Dynomight Motorsports
07-10-2015, 15:22
I think the Caster is working, I've been using it quite liberally to reduce my static camber and keep tire wear down. Although I'm not sure it makes a difference. Just the way I've always tuned.
A good example of caster is just turning your wheels to full lock on your Daily Driver/Road Car and seeing the Camber effects of the front wheels in your own driveway.

MABlosfeld
07-10-2015, 15:35
I think the Caster is working, I've been using it quite liberally to reduce my static camber and keep tire wear down. Although I'm not sure it makes a difference. Just the way I've always tuned.
A good example of caster is just turning your wheels to full lock on your Daily Driver/Road Car and seeing the Camber effects of the front wheels in your own driveway.

I tested CAMBER, CASTER, TOE, SPRINGS, DOWNFORCE for 270 hours and honestly did not notice effects
perhaps there is a combination of driving style and vehicle characteristics resulting in smooth effects hindering my perception.
Driving a car FA realize the effects but not as much as I think it should be.

OpticalHercules
07-10-2015, 16:18
Easiest way to imagine Caster is picture the front wheels on a shopping cart, how they are raked towards the read of the car. The wheel is set behind the pivot point. When the cart is pushed forward, the wheel trails behind the center of the wheel's axis, causing the cart to be easier to push in a straight line. If the caster were set at 0 with the wheel axle exactly in line with the pivot point, the cart would always try to turn itself from every minute little defect in the floor or tile/grout.

Same concept on cars. The greater the negative angle of caster(-7.0, -8.0, -9.0), the more tendency the wheel has to keep a straight line even when presented with imperfections in the road. The less camber (-6.0, -5.0,-4.0), the more tendency the wheel has of reacting to imperfections in the road, reducing straight line stability at high speed. The car will react faster to quick turns or slalom, but will fight the driver's input during prolonged turns especially with road imperfections during a prolonged turn (think Turn 1 at Brno). The trick is to find a happy medium for each track when adjusting your car's caster depending on the quality of the roadway and the length and speed of turns. When in doubt, lower caster (~-6.0/-6.4) will be better and require less additional tuning to optimize but at the expense of requiring more control input from the driver.

On GT3 I tend to keep my caster at -7.4 or -7.9 on the Aston Martin V12, though certain tracks I do bring it back to -6.0 or -6.4, Bathurst (oddball since long straights benefit form more caster, but the slalom will eat you alive with too much caster, nordschleife.

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
07-10-2015, 16:21
3) to set maximum DOWNFORCE
- More wear on the tires

4) to set DOWNFORCE minimum or zero
- Less wear on the tires

I actually disagree with these two points, at least as straight up notions. Higher DF can also lead to smaller slip angles during cornering which can reduce scrubbing and improve tyre wear. With high DF (and specifically WELL BALANCED, that is VERY important) the car can go through corners in a much more planted and stable manner, with low DF it's easier to end up going through them constantly squirming a bit, scrubbing away the surface.

Also I can confirm that higher amounts of DF can raise tyre pressures due to the added load separately from the pressure rise related to tyre temperature, and that the springs compress more with higher DF settings.

EDIT: Did a quick max neg - no - max positive toe test on the Test Track, which shows that toe does have an effect. Camber was -0.9 all around since I had it there for my other tests, DF was full (in hind sight could have been better to use some other setting, perhaps also minimum restrictor to emphasize the difference in drag via lower power available):

Max negative toe, -1.9 front and rear. You can see the force lines from the left side tyres are pulling towards the outside, because the negative toe is keeping them from pointing in the right direction. The grip/load cirles are also small. You can see that it's mostly the right side tyres that are heavily pointing to the right that are pulling the car around the corner, the grip circles are much bigger and the force lines show the clear pull as well. As a result the inside tyre, which are working harder, get heated up more. Speed with the settings I had at that time seemed to stabilize at around 284-285 km/h, though with very careful driving more could be gathered I wager.
219913

No toe, 0.0 front and rear. Force lines and grip circles aren't as visible because the tyres are working in the same direction, so each has to do less work. Turning effort spread between left and right side tyres. Significantly lower temperatures all around. Speed stabilized at around 292-293 km/h, more is available.
219914

Maximum toe, 1.9 degrees front and rear. Force lines clearly show that the outside tyres, which are heavily pointed to the right, are doing the majority of the turning effort, the inside tyres are actively resisting the turn. As a result the outside tyres heat up more. Speed again stabilized at around 284-285 km/h.
219915

So toe settings affect what tyres heat up, how much the heat up, where the forces of each tyre is pointing, and total rolling resistance.

EDIT2: Ah sorry, the images got resized when uploading, if anyone wants the originals I can upload them elsewhere.

EDIT3: TOE! I obviously bloody meant TOE, not camber... Fixed.

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
07-10-2015, 17:02
I also managed to isolate the slight camber thrust effect that we get from running high camber: YES, high camber DOES provide a lateral effect. It is a very small effect though.

I tested it by driving down the drag strip on the Test Track. With both minimum and maximum camber on all corners, the car tracked on completely straight, I could let go of the wheel and the car held the line perfectly. Then I tried running maximum camber on the left side and minimum on the right side, so -4.5 front and -3.5 rear on the left, and 0.0 front and rear on the right. This time I had to constantly keep a slight leftward pressure on the wheel to keep the car straight, if I let go the car veered to the right. This proves that there is a camber thrust effect from camber as there should be, though I do readily admit that the effect is more than likely smaller than it should be.

We already know that cars currently tend to get much lower rolling resistance with minimal camber settings than they do with high camber settings, meaning camber causes increased rolling resistance (something the devs have noticed and are fixing currently*). This is realistic based on the test data I've found, a German study made specifically on this subject, depending on the combination of camber and toe angles used, but the effect seems to be too high currently, it should mostly balance out in reality. However if the only thing the camber was doing was adding drag, then it would also have made the car veer to the left, since the left side tyres were the ones with high camber. So the camber thrust effect is at least strong enough to beat the increased drag from extra camber and still push the car slightly to one side.

The effect is likely smaller than it should be though, based on discussions with the devs during development and reading up on racing car dynamics the effects of camber thrust tend to be so good that you still get significant cornering benefits even when you're actually beyond the point where you have maximum contact patch, the main drawback being sharply increasing tyre wear with extreme camber settings. In more endurance oriented races I've seen mentions of running cambers in the -2 to -3 degree range, but in sprint racing things can be very different. Michelin for example recommended Porsce Supercup teams to run -4.5 degrees of camber front and rear as a starting point, and that the temperature differential between inside and outside of the tyre should be around 20 degrees Celsius (whereas many people often tout the 5 degree celsius rule).

So camber IS working, it's just not balanced correctly. It doesn't give enough in corners and takes away too much on straights.

*Worth noting is that this is NOT a fundamental issue of the tyre model, just a balancing issue. There was a time when maximum camber gave you so much cornering grip it was the only setting worth running. It's clearly hard to balance this with a dynamic physical tyre model, when you don't have a simple "camber sensivity" parameter at your disposal.

MABlosfeld
08-10-2015, 13:56
When I say I do not feel the effects I refer in conducting, sensitivity transmitted to the steering wheel and not on WEAR, SPEED, HEATING
1) CAMBER: -5.0 to set the left front wheel and 0.0 on the opposite wheel should leave the decentralized steering wheel and pulling to one side
2) CASTER: to set +7.9 should leave heavy wheel in a straight line and cornering light
3) TOE: here are some settings have been perceptible

Yesterday I decided to do some tests in conjunction with FFB

FFB OFF
TOE => some settings generated weak effects
CASTER => at me did not cause effects
CAMBER => at me did not cause effects

FFB STRENGTH 100%
TOE => generated strong effect
CASTER => at me did not cause effects
CAMBER => generated strong effect

Today I will test with FFB off the steering wheel is decentralized after collision.

Test results with FFB on
Front left wheel camber // => -3.9 // right wheel => 0.0
- EFFECT generated when braking, the steering wheel turned slightly to the right of changing the car's trajectory to the right
Normal camber
- Left frontal collision generated EFFECT, decentralized the steering wheel to the left side by changing the trajectory also

Test results with FFB off
Front left wheel camber // => -3.9 // right wheel => 0.0
- Did not generate Effect on braking, the steering wheel and the trajectory remained centralized
Normal camber
- Did not generate EFFECT after collision, steering wheel and the trajectory remained centralized

OpticalHercules
08-10-2015, 15:29
Maybe it's that you're looking for the 'feel' of the car which caster probably won't affect much. I personally think your expected caster feel is backwards, I expect it to be lighter/easier to control in straight line and harder to induce a turn with higher settings.

I do not have a FFB wheel, I use a 458 Spider, so I don't even have controller rumble. All I have to notice these effects is my perception of what how the car is behaving based on my inputs. Camber I get very little 'feel' from, notice very little control change no matter the settings. I set my camber almost exclusively on tire temp models and empirical testing of what seems to work better on any given track. Toe in I notice intensely going from -0.1 to -0.2 or from -0.0 to +0.1. Very minor changes in Toe I get huge returns on, and I do use a wide variety of toe settings on the same car depending on what track and my turning style on those tracks. If I'm on a track that I need to pull through higher speed turns I tend to stay -0.1 (catalunya/Spa) -0.2 (Brno/Nurburgring GP), +0.1 (Laguna Seca, Dubai GP, 24hr Le Mans... I like it twitchy there, I know that's strange). All of these are with the Aston Martin V12 GT3. Different cars/classes get different settings, obviously.

MABlosfeld
08-10-2015, 15:46
Maybe it's that you're looking for the 'feel' of the car which caster probably won't affect much. I personally think your expected caster feel is backwards, I expect it to be lighter/easier to control in straight line and harder to induce a turn with higher settings.

I do not have a FFB wheel, I use a 458 Spider, so I don't even have controller rumble. All I have to notice these effects is my perception of what how the car is behaving based on my inputs. Camber I get very little 'feel' from, notice very little control change no matter the settings. I set my camber almost exclusively on tire temp models and empirical testing of what seems to work better on any given track. Toe in I notice intensely going from -0.1 to -0.2 or from -0.0 to +0.1. Very minor changes in Toe I get huge returns on, and I do use a wide variety of toe settings on the same car depending on what track and my turning style on those tracks. If I'm on a track that I need to pull through higher speed turns I tend to stay -0.1 (catalunya/Spa) -0.2 (Brno/Nurburgring GP), +0.1 (Laguna Seca, Dubai GP, 24hr Le Mans... I like it twitchy there, I know that's strange). All of these are with the Aston Martin V12 GT3. Different cars/classes get different settings, obviously.

I play NASCAR RACING of PAPYRUS hand drive without FFB and all the effects work:
- When striking the steering wheel and the trajectory were decentralized
- To change the camber, depending on the amounts invested, the steering wheel and trajectory were decentralized
- Caster, tire pressure generated effects and was felt
I know that each track has its irregularities and particularities and that the effects produced are different, for this reason, my tests are performed straight.

MABlosfeld
09-10-2015, 02:15
NEW Test results with FFB off
Front left wheel camber // => -3.9 // right wheel => 0.0
- Did not generate Effect on braking, the steering wheel and the trajectory remained centralized
Normal camber
- generate EFFECT after collision, steering wheel pulls to the side and changed the trajectory