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PC49NZ
19-06-2015, 04:38
Hello Fellow PC Simmers.

As I don't have a technical brain part in my mullet, can someone please tell me if internet Speeds pay a part in games online. In NZ we have had the usual broadband speed but over the past couple of months they have added Ultra fast broadband and the top of the shelf DSL I think it's called.

So the question is, does broadband speed matter a great deal in online games.

Regards,
Jim.

TheReaper GT
19-06-2015, 04:41
The connection speed these days is pretty much good for everything, the key for online gaming is latency. Go to speedtest.net and test yours, the lower the better.

madmax2069
19-06-2015, 06:07
Theres still quite a few places that have horribly slow broadband (if you can even call it broadband).

And yes speed plays a huge part in how good your experience is in online games. Just because your internet connection has a low ping in tests doesnt mean it has enough bandwidth to transfer the required data fast enough to have a good experience with.

Basic cable internet around my mother's house starts at 2Mb download speed and .500 Mb upload speed. Thats hardly enough to handle modern games, it will play most old games online just fine though.

Your download speed is important but not as important as your upload speed (which is usually slower then download speed). And theres is even slower broadband services then the above. If you have a decent download but a very slow upload speed will cause you to lag very easily, and you'll have issues hosting games, if not make it impossible.

Some areas have a decent start out internet package (15Mb download and 2.5Mb upload) which will handle many games without too much of an issue.

When you get internet for gaming you want to make sure it has a decent upload speed as well as download speed. The higher the upload speed is the better experience you'll have in online games.

Just think of internet bandwidth speed as a straw, and the data a game transmits like a liquid. Size of the straw will determine how easy and fast it will be to suck said liquid up, the thicker the liquid the bigger you want the straw to be so it will be easier to suck up a thicker liquid. If the straw is too small it will be harder and take a lot longer to suck up thicker liquid.

Fast download speeds is good for streaming, fast upload speeds is good for gaming. Id say at least 2.5 Mbps upload would be good enough for many games, if not most games.

Having a slow upload speed with a game that demands more upload bandwidth then what your internet is capable of you'll going to lag. Being that download speeds are mainly a lot faster then upload speeds you dont really have to worry about the download speeds.

PC49NZ
19-06-2015, 09:53
Two absolutely excellent replies. I thank you both and I'm sure this is just as important reply to a lot of other gamers as it is to me.

Well done guys, congratulations.

Jim.

Crazy Stiggy
19-06-2015, 12:53
Problem is us South African players who would love to play internationally are just to far away. We hit with a minimum ping of 200. So there is a lot of cars jumping around. Sad but loved to join fellow Xbox guys for some races.

LADY GEMMA JANE
19-06-2015, 13:05
I just done a speedtest
ping 15ms, download 38 meg, upload 10meg

sky fibre UK

Lawndarts
19-06-2015, 15:02
Something else to consider, even if you and your buddies have blazing internet speeds, they will only be as good as the worst ping rate in the lobby. So if someone with crummy internet joins your game the experience will be diminished considerably for everyone. SMS can do the most to resolve this delta by optimizing packets and how latency is handled, as well as dynamic reductions to physics visual effects (not actual calculations) etc.

Cars hopping around is a common early "solution" to adjusting to latency, ghosting cars/players that aren't returning minimum ping requirements is another preliminary solution to online play (not sure if pcars does this). As it gets further optimized it should continue to improve and the experience should be less dependent on ultra fast pings, but it's hard work.

Pro tip: code predictive calculations instead or reactive ones. If you are waiting for feedback from other players and there is too much latency then it will feel like random stuff is happening... But if you determine ahead and resolve based on a tiny packet confirmation (not the full data) things will feel a lot more natural and consistent... Console games are quite good at this due to being in a "closed" network. Sorry if this sounds like a strange disruption, it's just what teams of mine have had to do on other games.

MJP
19-06-2015, 15:19
Basic cable internet around my mother's house starts at 2Mb download speed and .500 Mb upload speed. Thats hardly enough to handle modern games, it will play most old games online just fine though.

Utter nonsense (well for sim racing games at least, I don't play any other games online). Sure if you want to host or stream then speeds especially upload comes into play but playing as just a client you don't need much at all. Next time you're online try running with a bandwidth meter and see just how little is being used. Latency and packet loss are more important that how many 10's of MB your connection is rated at.

Lawndarts
19-06-2015, 15:30
Utter nonsense (well for sim racing games at least, I don't play any other games online). Sure if you want to host or stream then speeds especially upload comes into play but playing as just a client you don't need much at all. Next time you're online try running with a bandwidth meter and see just how little is being used. Latency and packet loss are more important that how many 10's of MB your connection is rated at.

Exactly, all online code starts as a big packet (still generally far less than a meg), then essentials are separated and prioritized above non essentials. Track position, relative player positions, some physics, etc are essential, damage, ancillary details, audio que's etc are non essential. But that doesn't mean they get dropped, just adjusted in priority.

Ever notice how an online game can "degrade"? This is a window into how those priorities are set in a given game, generally more obvious when your connection is severely effected. The speed up when it clears? That's back packets trying to catch up to the client state. All of this can be masked to a large degree though optimization of net code.

Understanding all this is realizing that nothing happens in "real time", even the time it takes for your senses to reach your brain is a small delay... We are all living in the past! :o

Pamellaaa
19-06-2015, 15:38
I run on a reasonably poor connection in terms of speed but its stable and my latency is decent so I rarely have any issues online, I have 2.5 - 3.5Mbps down and up to about 1Mbps up and for the most part this is fine, even with Teamspeak running in the background consuming a bit of bandwidth.

There is a lot to say for home network optimization as well, avoid wireless if at all possible as this introduces higher latency and reduces effective bandwidth (through packet loss), minimize other drains on your network (other PC's doing updates, other people streaming or downloading etc) and setup your router to forward any specific ports that are required for games you are playing. This is an often overlooked aspect of online gaming and by doing a few simple things you can see dramatic improvements in online gaming connections.

madmax2069
19-06-2015, 15:38
Utter nonsense (well for sim racing games at least, I don't play any other games online). Sure if you want to host or stream then speeds especially upload comes into play but playing as just a client you don't need much at all. Next time you're online try running with a bandwidth meter and see just how little is being used. Latency and packet loss are more important that how many 10's of MB your connection is rated at.

I tried playing this game with the above speeds (2Mb down, .500Mb upload), guess what the game was a lag fest, seeing huge lag spikes, and timed out quite a bit, and that was not even hosting a game (that was just joining other hosted games). Had to upgrade the tier (15Mb down, 2.5Mb upload) then the game became perfectly playable joining other games, and hosting.

Pamellaaa
19-06-2015, 15:42
I tried playing this game with the above speeds (2Mb down, .500Mb upload), guess what the game was a lag fest, seeing huge lag spikes, and timed out quite a bit, and that was not even hosting a game (that was just joining other hosted games). Had to upgrade the tier (15Mb down, 2.5Mb upload) then the game became perfectly playable joining other games, and hosting.

This is likely not the only factor, as others have mentioned if you are in a lobby with people from halfway across the world who have high ping rates and unstable connections you would not get a clean lobby. Speed is part of it but its a small part and its importance is often overestimated. Stability, latency and correct setup are all more important IMO.

Steve Dean
19-06-2015, 16:06
Speed wise online gaming doesn't use a lot albeit a lot of people think having the fastest BB in the world will give them a better online gaming experience which isn't the case if your just joining lobbies / servers.

12 Players in server and i did a print screen showing speed being used to upload download data from players etc.. im not host
Uploading data @ 192Kbps Downloading @ 160Kbps

208384

After closing pcars just to show nothing being used net wise in background

208385

My internet speed

http://www.speedtest.net/result/4444747088.png (http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4444747088)

LADY GEMMA JANE
19-06-2015, 16:08
http://www.speedtest.net/result/4444752832.png (http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4444752832)

mine

TheReaper GT
19-06-2015, 16:36
http://www.speedtest.net/result/4444752832.png (http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4444752832)

mine

Look at you faster than 75% of gb hahuahua