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2pfspiff
04-09-2015, 18:28
I was wondering if any one came up with a set up guide that explains what each car setting does and how it affects the car on the track. I am new to setting up the car and would like to have a better understanding as to what each setting does. Thanks for all and any help that is given.

Umer Ahmad
04-09-2015, 18:52
You've already gone through the description on screen?

Try this also:

http://www.racedepartment.com/resources/advanced-f1-setup-guide.1355/download?version=1985

Mowzer
06-09-2015, 14:57
Nice thanks for the link Ahmed :).

Dynomight Motorsports
06-09-2015, 20:37
Just remember the most important adjustments are usually the Nut behind the wheel. You can tune on your car all you want, but if you aren't good at a track, not hitting your marks than you can find yourself very frustrated quickly. Once you start tuning its pretty awesome, and you'll understand some small adjustments to get you started at each track then go from there. But it takes a lot of time with some cars at some tracks. And sometimes its nice to try different setups that fit your driving style.
Once you understand what adjustments do what.. try this: http://projectcarssetups.eu/#/bycar

Yardstik
07-09-2015, 19:33
Excellent information guys. Im a noob to tuning also.. .

ashasha
07-09-2015, 21:21
Just remember the most important adjustments are usually the Nut behind the wheel. You can tune on your car all you want, but if you aren't good at a track, not hitting your marks than you can find yourself very frustrated quickly. Once you start tuning its pretty awesome, and you'll understand some small adjustments to get you started at each track then go from there. But it takes a lot of time with some cars at some tracks. And sometimes its nice to try different setups that fit your driving style.
Once you understand what adjustments do what.. try this: http://projectcarssetups.eu/#/bycar
I don't want to bring up the Forza thing, but you could download tunings for your car which was great if you don't know what you are doing and didn't want to tweak....but most of them were locked which meant that there was no way to learn from them. I thought that was a horrible decision even though I suppose it protects some trade secrets of the high level tuners.

On the other hand its a hassle to have to manually input the settings from a website, but I think that at some point I will start to see better what I need to do to do my own tuning.

OpticalHercules
08-09-2015, 00:06
Check out here: http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?23371-Car-setup-guides&highlight=tuning

At the bottom of the first post are two PDF attachments. View the one in your language (Eng, I assume). They are flowcharts of how to tune your car based on what you are experiencing while driving the car. I strongly suggest printing it out if possible and just keeping it handy while you play.

Dynomight Motorsports
09-09-2015, 01:45
Also, tuning is not always black n' white. What I mean by that is there are several ways to address the same issues through different adjustments. There are many different philosophies and theories, and the best thing is learn what each adjustment does, and experiment with small increments in tuning the car to fit YOUR driving style. What works for you at one track may not work for you at another. I learn something new every time I take the car out on the track.

I was struggling at Brands Hatch, sliding the front wheels with what I thought was a pretty competitive setup time wise. I thought I might just be over-driving the corners. But I wanted to make the car better. I tried tire pressures, springs, camber, caster.. What ended up working was just reducing the front sway bar, and the car picked up almost a whole second, compared to the other changes.

widcard
09-09-2015, 02:13
Just remember the most important adjustments are usually the Nut behind the wheel. You can tune on your car all you want, but if you aren't good at a track, not hitting your marks than you can find yourself very frustrated quickly. Once you start tuning its pretty awesome, and you'll understand some small adjustments to get you started at each track then go from there. But it takes a lot of time with some cars at some tracks. And sometimes its nice to try different setups that fit your driving style.
Once you understand what adjustments do what.. try this: http://projectcarssetups.eu/#/bycar

Here's raising a beer to this one,,,That's the best dead on advice a guy could hope for,,,:very_drunk:

Haiden
09-09-2015, 14:51
I was wondering if any one came up with a set up guide that explains what each car setting does and how it affects the car on the track. I am new to setting up the car and would like to have a better understanding as to what each setting does. Thanks for all and any help that is given.

His videos are kind of slow--and he can be a little annoying sometimes--but they pretty cover all the settings. Not bad, if you're just starting to get into tuning.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtpKkAuojT0

Spiny Anteater
09-09-2015, 18:26
Also, tuning is not always black n' white. What I mean by that is there are several ways to address the same issues through different adjustments. There are many different philosophies and theories, and the best thing is learn what each adjustment does, and experiment with small increments in tuning the car to fit YOUR driving style. What works for you at one track may not work for you at another. I learn something new every time I take the car out on the track.

I was struggling at Brands Hatch, sliding the front wheels with what I thought was a pretty competitive setup time wise. I thought I might just be over-driving the corners. But I wanted to make the car better. I tried tire pressures, springs, camber, caster.. What ended up working was just reducing the front sway bar, and the car picked up almost a whole second, compared to the other changes.

This is very true. I've experienced this a few times where making a change to a setting doesn't seem to do much. Then you try something else which ostensibly makes the same change and it all just clicks into place.

For me, the most glaring example was the BMW M1 around Bathurst where it actually felt pretty good everywhere apart from if I clipped a curb in which case the front end would bounce all over the place. Eventually, I tried softening the front springs and correspondingly stiffening the front sway bar. Immediately it was obvious that I had the front springs too stiff in my original tune as it rode curbs so much better, yet had similar turn-in characteristics. With that relatively minor change, I knocked a second off my best time, but more important made a huge improvement in consistency.

2pfspiff
10-09-2015, 02:14
Just remember the most important adjustments are usually the Nut behind the wheel. You can tune on your car all you want, but if you aren't good at a track, not hitting your marks than you can find yourself very frustrated quickly. Once you start tuning its pretty awesome, and you'll understand some small adjustments to get you started at each track then go from there. But it takes a lot of time with some cars at some tracks. And sometimes its nice to try different setups that fit your driving style.
Once you understand what adjustments do what.. try this: http://projectcarssetups.eu/#/bycar

Look once the car is setup I should never have to lift when entering a turn. The car should just hold its line right? :tongue-new::stupid:

Seriously thanks for the guide and the help. I know just enough about tuning a car to hurt myself. I just made a copy of the guide you posted. I also forgot about this guide for Nascar 2003 seasons (http://www.racelinecentral.com/RacingSetupGuide.html. It has a good explanation of what the different settings do, it may have some use even if it was written for Oval. Towards the back it has handling issue and what to correct for those issues.

Dynomight Motorsports
10-09-2015, 03:03
That is a good one.. I started out on Ovals.. believe it or not. I'm a huge NASCAR fan, but I found Road Racing to be extremely satisfying, and a hell of a lot easier to set up a car for. Road Racing setups are for the most part symmetrical, where as oval setups very greatly asymmetrically.

AdM1
10-09-2015, 03:27
http://i.imgur.com/byemI.jpg

2pfspiff
10-09-2015, 03:29
http://i.imgur.com/byemI.jpg

Already added the chart to the things that I copied. Thank god I am at work. Thanks