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jimmyb_84
08-12-2015, 16:21
Hi all decided to take the plunge and started to learn "C" programming but just wondered what you use to to write/edit and compile/execute your code?

I extremely new to this, I like to learn new stuff taught myself XHTML and CSS via you tube along with excel stuff, I'm no expert but I've learnt enough to hold my own ish and understand how it works. So my next challenge is C and C++ (C first). I know I'm not going to create great things anytime soon as this will take me a few years but I need to start somewhere. As a 30yr with a few kids it'll take a while but I also plan to teach the kids what I've learnt when there older.

Advice welcomed

Lars Rosenquist
08-12-2015, 18:26
I use Visual Studio 2015 with the Resharper plugin from JetBrains. If you're new to do this, I would suggest starting with the example apps provided in this subforum by several people, then work from there. It's also good to set a goal in advance of what you want to achieve. :)

jimmyb_84
08-12-2015, 18:45
I use Visual Studio 2015 with the Resharper plugin from JetBrains. If you're new to do this, I would suggest starting with the example apps provided in this subforum by several people, then work from there. It's also good to set a goal in advance of what you want to achieve. :)

Thank you for the advice, I shall take a look at the examples within the forum st some point but first I want to understand the structure of the code, what I have to add and how to write it, in terms of any particular order.

A goal is a difficult one but maybe to reproduce my strategy calculator in a program with either manual inputs or from UPD data. That's a very long way off.

Forgot to mention I'll be using OSX, I have Excode but think it might be a little too advanced for me right now.

Lars Rosenquist
08-12-2015, 19:01
On OSX you could use something like Eclipse, NetBeans or CLion. Last one is not free though, but has superior editing and refactoring capabilities.

jimmyb_84
08-12-2015, 19:03
On OSX you could use something like Eclipse, NetBeans or CLion. Last one is not free though, but has superior editing and refactoring capabilities.

brilliant stuff, I shall have a look tonight

Lars Rosenquist
10-12-2015, 17:44
Almost forgot: XCode is also an option, free from Apple themselves.

jimmyb_84
10-12-2015, 18:07
Almost forgot: XCode is also an option, free from Apple themselves.

Yes I have that installed already but I think it's going to be too complicated at the moment, the two programs I have Netbeans included sort of hide the code making my understanding less, I will start at the basics and see how I go.

jimmyb_84
23-12-2015, 07:17
I've finally made a decision on where I will create my "app" seeing as I run on Mac and that all the tools to create on IOS platform are there I shall try Xcode using the swift variant.

I found a lot of documentation, tutorials and even a free book via iBooks. With all this info at my finger tips I think at this stage I'd be mad not to use it. Also from a development point of view I own a Mac, iPhone 6 and access to an iPad. This should help with testing eventually!

venquessa
23-12-2015, 08:34
Learning C/C++ will be greatly influenced by where you start. This is because C/C++ is a very low level language. C/C++ on their own are all but entirely useless. You'll find this if you buy (or download) a generic C book. All C development environments will come with the likes of "Std lib" with stuff like "printf" and "scanf", but beyond reading and writing files or the console it won't let you do much. This is where the development environment you choose comes into play.

With Microshaft you would probably be steered down the "Managed .Net" C++ route. The C/C++ language becomes just stuff you 'hang off the framework' while the framework itself (.Net) say provides all the components and structures for you to get stuff done. Stuff like opening windows, creating forms, interfacing with OS features. It also provides much higher level components for read/writing files etc. .Net also provides memory management and dynamic object allocation etc. So you don't need to worry about heap allocation much, although learning the difference between "stack / local" allocation and "heap" allocation is essential.

I have never programmed for OSx, but I imagine Apple have some form for C++ framework that will be similar to .Net. Being on OSx though means you are in a Unix environment. This makes things somewhat different to MS land. You should have access to lots of shared libraries with easy to find documentation, such as libstcc++ and it's friends.

If you are serious about learning C in a Unix environment it might help to learn some basic underlying Unix principles, preferably first, or along the way. Do not get too freaked out by "pointers", they seem like you will never understand them at first, but they are absolutely crutial to C development, so stay at it. Use the Internet to find more and more examples and explainations of pointers, pointers to pointers, arrays of pointers, arrays of pointers to pointers, dereferencing pointers etc. etc. It will pay off in the end.

Yours ven, Low latency C, C++ EFT programmer and currently Java, javascript and Angular developer.

EDIT: If I'm honest I would say C/C++ is maybe not the best choice to start programming. C/C++ do not hide the intricate details of how computers work under the hood and require you understand a lot of that, they are also, as above highly dependant on where you program, which OS, which IDE, which libraries. Java on the other hand is much higher level, though very similar. It abstracts away a lot of the nitty gritty detail and gets stuff done faster in coding terms, while maybe being less efficient and more bloated.

jimmyb_84
23-12-2015, 09:33
Thanks for the advice, I'm starting from the beginning "hello world".

I took a look at Java based as I have installed Netbeans on my Mac however I'm having trouble adding the debugger to begin (apparently I doesn't have one on Mac). I played about with the Java UI which look straight forward apart from adding the actually action code. the to learn bit. I wondered if I could add a Java application to HTML5 as I know enough to survive, but how to package it becomes another issue.

so I thought I'd go with what I have available. I have a Mac and apple stuff plus Xcode which is free along with all the other tools required and a comprehensive tutorials and free stuff I've found.

venquessa
23-12-2015, 09:44
Writing UIs isn't all that trival. Tutorials will certainly help you fire up a form and do some mickey mouse stuff, but UIs quickly build to become non-trival and require a lot of time and effort. Java UI toolkits aren't great either. UIs tend to be quite verbose with everything needing specified and thus you need a good IDE and UI editor. These are highly dependant on the framework / IDE / OS and language you use.

Don't worry about not having a debugger. It's nice, but you can just use "probe lines", ie. print stuff out to the console instead.

Here's a goal for you. Java (recommended) or C if you feel brave.

1. Open a UDP Stream/Socket on the pCars port - beware, you may need to research accepting broadcast packets.
2. Read from the socket while pCars is in game.
3. Use the pCars API documentation to decode some of the packet.
4. Log some stuff to the console, tyre temperature say.

Then I would research how bad a job you did regarding design, structure, convention and patterns. The main ones I will hint to you are, Layering and division of the UI and the 'backend' code. They should never mix. I would start with:

The low level network object which holds the socket and reads the raw packets. When constructed it would open the UDP port and after that everytime you call read() it would block until data is available.
Then a pCars decoder class/object which takes the raw packet as an argument and returns an object with all the values decoded as variables, each with a "getSuchAndSuch()" method.
Then, finally a display class which would do all the System.out.println() stuff or printf stuff to the console.

The advantage now is that you can take that final display class and swap it later for a GUI or a mobile display class.... or a Servlet which feeds data to a JSP and HTML5.

jimmyb_84
23-12-2015, 11:06
Writing UIs isn't all that trival. Tutorials will certainly help you fire up a form and do some mickey mouse stuff, but UIs quickly build to become non-trival and require a lot of time and effort. Java UI toolkits aren't great either. UIs tend to be quite verbose with everything needing specified and thus you need a good IDE and UI editor. These are highly dependant on the framework / IDE / OS and language you use.

Don't worry about not having a debugger. It's nice, but you can just use "probe lines", ie. print stuff out to the console instead.

Here's a goal for you. Java (recommended) or C if you feel brave.

1. Open a UDP Stream/Socket on the pCars port - beware, you may need to research accepting broadcast packets.
2. Read from the socket while pCars is in game.
3. Use the pCars API documentation to decode some of the packet.
4. Log some stuff to the console, tyre temperature say.

Then I would research how bad a job you did regarding design, structure, convention and patterns. The main ones I will hint to you are, Layering and division of the UI and the 'backend' code. They should never mix. I would start with:

The low level network object which holds the socket and reads the raw packets. When constructed it would open the UDP port and after that everytime you call read() it would block until data is available.
Then a pCars decoder class/object which takes the raw packet as an argument and returns an object with all the values decoded as variables, each with a "getSuchAndSuch()" method.
Then, finally a display class which would do all the System.out.println() stuff or printf stuff to the console.

The advantage now is that you can take that final display class and swap it later for a GUI or a mobile display class.... or a Servlet which feeds data to a JSP and HTML5.

I'll report back in 6 months, although I have seen a few app devs release their code for UDP. ;)

I'm a little confused where to build this Xcode or netbeans? Am I using Java, swift or C. I'm a complete newbie

AtomicSphincter
23-12-2015, 11:50
Venquessa thank you for posting that info. I'm just starting to look into the world of programming and it's been very intimidating so far. Lots to learn is an understatement. I'm blown away that a phone app can connect to an xbox game and receive live data! I'm eager to learn whatever I need to know in order to write a cool little app telemetry app, and more! Quick question, how's C# different from C or C++ ? Being a complete newbie, should I start with Java, C#, C, C++ or something else?

jimmyb_84
23-12-2015, 11:54
Venquessa thank you for posting that info. I'm just starting to look into the world of programming and it's been very intimidating so far. Lots to learn is an understatement. I'm blown away that a phone app can connect to an xbox game and receive live data! I'm eager to learn whatever I need to know in order to write a cool little app telemetry app, and more! Quick question, how's C# different from C or C++ ? Being a complete newbie, should I start with Java, C#, C, C++ or something else?

I know the feeling it's a complete minefield!

jimmyb_84
23-12-2015, 22:41
it's not massive but....

I just wrote some code

let fuel = 3.0
let lap = 10.0
let fuelSummary = "you need \(fuel * lap) litres of fuel."

and it actually worked! This is huge for me

AtomicSphincter
24-12-2015, 00:40
it's not massive but....

I just wrote some code

let fuel = 3.0
let lap = 10.0
let fuelSummary = "you need \(fuel * lap) litres of fuel."

and it actually worked! This is huge for me

Great job! You're way ahead of me for sure! Does that calculate how much fuel you need?
I read last night on the web that C isn't an easy thing to learn first, Python was mentioned as an easier way to start. I've never even heard of Python till I read that last night. Gonna have to take a look at it.

jimmyb_84
24-12-2015, 09:37
Great job! You're way ahead of me for sure! Does that calculate how much fuel you need?
I read last night on the web that C isn't an easy thing to learn first, Python was mentioned as an easier way to start. I've never even heard of Python till I read that last night. Gonna have to take a look at it.

Thanks you, I'm well chuffed with myself after a little bit of swearing I started a swift tutorial lesson 1 on Xcode (IOS) where it gave examples I typed them rather than just copy and pasted in Xcode's playground. Once I'd done a few I sort of understood what was happening and tried my own and it worked!

I have an idea how I'd use UDP data for the calculation above but it throws up a millions possibilities so lots to learn yet but a start at least. I shall continue with the tutorials.

Ye calculates fuel for a race based on a pre-set fuel and lap although you'll notice I had to input laps with .0 because without it the formats didn't match and the calculation didn't work.

venquessa
24-12-2015, 11:08
Python is a great utility language, but I wouldn't want to programme a whole application in it. I also would not recommend it as a starter langage as Python is a bit of a black sheep, it does things in weird ways, not bad ways, just weird. I would stick with a "C syntax, Object orientated" language to start with.

C# isn't anything like C. It's more like Java with a few C-like structures like "delegates" built in. Though in C delegations are just inherent and done by passing call back pointers to functions etc. C# is a Microsoft language for .Net and isn't really used anywhere else. However, if you want to develop exclusively for the Microsoft platform, it's not that bad a choice to get started with.



let fuel = 3.0
let lap = 10.0
let fuelSummary = "you need \(fuel * lap) litres of fuel."


What language is that? BASIC? It's odd as normally you would not be allowed bare variable names within in strings. For example:

Java: String fuelSummary = "You need "+ (fuel * lap) + " litres of fuel";
C:
int FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN = 100;
char fuelSummary[FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN];
memset( fuelSummary, '\0', FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN );
int fuelSummaryLen = snprintf( fuelSummary, FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN, "You need %f litres of fuel", (fuel * lap) );

Now you see why I say to maybe start with something other than C/C++.

Perl does allow variables within strings, but it uses the $ prefix.
my fuelSummary = "You need $fuel*$lap litres of fuel";
However, this might not do what you expect, as I believe you will get "You need 3.0*10.0 litres of fuel" out the other side.
my fuelSummary = "You need ".$fuel*$lap." litres of fuel";
Should work better.

jimmyb_84
24-12-2015, 11:14
Python is a great utility language, but I wouldn't want to programme a whole application in it. I also would not recommend it as a starter langage as Python is a bit of a black sheep, it does things in weird ways, not bad ways, just weird. I would stick with a "C syntax, Object orientated" language to start with.

C# isn't anything like C. It's more like Java with a few C-like structures like "delegates" built in. Though in C delegations are just inherent and done by passing call back pointers to functions etc. C# is a Microsoft language for .Net and isn't really used anywhere else.



What language is that? BASIC? It's odd as normally you would not be allowed bare variable names within in strings. For example:

Java: String fuelSummary = "You need "+ (fuel * lap) + " litres of fuel";
C:
int FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN = 100;
char fuelSummary[FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN];
memset( fuelSummary, '\0', FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN );
int fuelSummaryLen = sprintf( fuelSummary, FUEL_SUMMARY_MAX_LEN, "You need %f litres of fuel", (fuel * lap) );

Now you see why I say to maybe start with something other than C/C++.

Perl does allow variables within strings, but it uses the $ prefix.
my fuelSummary = "You need $fuel*$lap litres of fuel";
However, this might not do what you expect, as I believe you will get "You need 3.0*10.0 litres of fuel" out the other side.
my fuelSummary = "You need ".$fuel*$lap." litres of fuel";
Should work better.

It's swift with Cocoa. It's iOS, I cannot really comment on syntax as its new to me anyway. It seems to work in Xcode

venquessa
24-12-2015, 11:26
If you are on Linux or OSx, you have quite a few languages (probably) already available. Open a Terminal / Console and try this.

perl -e 'print "Hello world\n";'

If it prints "Hello world" then you have perl. You can make it into a program by saving the following as HelloWorld.pl



#!/usr/bin/perl

print "Hello World!";


And run it with:

perl HelloWorld.pl

Or...

perl -e '$fuel=3; $laps=10; print "You need ".( $fuel * $laps ). " litres of fuel\n"';

You probably also have "bash" or some form of shell.

fuel=3; laps=10; echo "You need $(( $fuel * $laps )) litres of fuel";

venquessa
24-12-2015, 11:34
Programming challenge for the beginners:

Write a routine (preferably a function or method) which:

Takes the inputs:
Integer - minutes remaining
Integer - seconds per lap (average lap time in seconds)

And returns / prints:
Estimated laps remaining as a rounded up integer.

Then another routine / function / method that takes the output of the one above, eg

Inputs:
Integer - number of laps remaining
Real / Float - Fuel per lap
Integer - Reserve fuel

And returns the amount of fuel you will need to finish the race with "reserve fuel" remaining.

EDIT: BTW I am in work, but it's Christmas Eve and there is no work worth starting and there are no managers around, so I'm bored :)

venquessa
24-12-2015, 11:45
Ye calculates fuel for a race based on a pre-set fuel and lap although you'll notice I had to input laps with .0 because without it the formats didn't match and the calculation didn't work.

Typically computers favour Integers (round numbers). When you are using a "typeless" language or "loosely typed language" and you don't specifiy what type you want a variable to be the computer will try and infer it. So if you do:

fuel = 1;
laps = 2;

Then the computer will assume they are integers.

This isn't a big problem for multiplication. However for division it becomes an issue as computers are also particularly lazy. They will do "integer division" anywhere they think they can get away with it. For example:

int myNumber = 10;
int myOtherNumber = 4;
print myNumber / myOtherNumber;

Will most likely print: "2";

If you want the proper answer you will need to make at least the divisor a real number or a floating point.
int myNumber = 10;
float myOtherNumber = 4;
print myNumber / myOtherNumber;

Should now print "2.5" as the computer is forced to consider one of the numbers in the calculation as a real number it is forced to consider the whole sum to be a decimal sum and uses floating point arithmetic.

The other way is to cast one of them....
print myNumber / (float)myOtherNumber;

Or do dirty tricks like:
print myNumber / (myOtherNumber*1.0);

Your mileage may vary on the last one and as it's ambiguous I would avoid it.

As a final little tit-bit, try this...

aThird = 1 / 3;
print aThrid * 3;

You won't get 1.

float someVariable = 10 / 3;
print someVariable * 3;

Why doesn't it print 10?

Answer: Because computers cannot do "thirds".

Another one.... divide a number by 1000, 1000 times. Then multiply it again by 1000, 1000 times. Why don't you get the original number?

jimmyb_84
24-12-2015, 12:28
Programming challenge for the beginners:

Write a routine (preferably a function or method) which:

Takes the inputs:
Integer - minutes remaining
Integer - seconds per lap (average lap time in seconds)

And returns / prints:
Estimated laps remaining as a rounded up integer.

Then another routine / function / method that takes the output of the one above, eg

Inputs:
Integer - number of laps remaining
Real / Float - Fuel per lap
Integer - Reserve fuel

And returns the amount of fuel you will need to finish the race with "reserve fuel" remaining.

EDIT: BTW I am in work, but it's Christmas Eve and there is no work worth starting and there are no managers around, so I'm bored :)

funny you should mention lap times, I played about a little bit with them your right about lap times in seconds 1:45.765 doesn't work for example. I will try your challenges soon got busy time coming up now.

I think my challenge will be formats and getting info in/out in formats I need. It's all good fun so far quite enjoying it

AtomicSphincter
24-12-2015, 13:43
Venquessa thanks again for posting useful info. I mentioned Python here because all over the web it's described as a "comprehensive high-level scripting language", not sure what that means. What is "high-level"? You called it a utility language, can you elaborate on that a little? I really want to get my feet wet in coding, was gonna start with C but folks online say its uber hard as a first language to learn, plus that bit you posted written in C scared me to death. Most websites noted that it's more important to know what your goal is and not what language to learn first. Having said that, my goal is to write a full GUI UDP app, such as HUD dash(free android). Venquessa if you're still ready this, what do I need to know to accomplish this long term goal? What language would be the best for it? Thanks in advance!

venquessa
24-12-2015, 13:48
funny you should mention lap times, I played about a little bit with them your right about lap times in seconds 1:45.765 doesn't work for example. I will try your challenges soon got busy time coming up now.

I think my challenge will be formats and getting info in/out in formats I need. It's all good fun so far quite enjoying it

These are the trickier things. Having data in one format and converting it to another as well as dates and times.

Probably the number 1 most common conversion, that you have already done and probably didn't realise it is: numbers to text. "print 3+4;" requires that 7 is converted to a 'string' to print as text. Most languages will simply take care of this for you and implicitly convert it behind the scenes. C will not and "printf( 2+3 );" will throw a compiler error. In C you have to explicitly convert numbers to text, usually using the printf / sprintf family of functions, eg: printf("%d", 2+3 ); will work. The %d says, "convert the first argument to a string, assuming it is one or more digits, and put it here". If you try and trick it with: printf("%d", "barney"); You will probably get a string with something like "NaN" in it. "Not a Number";

The more problematic one and if you do take up programming will be the bane of your existence, is converting text into numbers, usually from user input. It's not that it's difficult, most if not all languages have conversion functions, just that you have to take care of all the problem cases, such as: What if the string is empty? What if it doesn't contain a number at all? What if it contains a type of number you didn't expect? You might expect to get a number back, but you have to account for the eventuality that you don't or that asking the language to convert the string "bob" to a number may cause it to crash your program!

Dates and times. This is a rule of thumb for any code developer. Do not try date/time mathematics yourself. It's a rabbit hole you will never come back out of. The exception is if you can reduce everything you need to seconds or at least to a single unit. Once you need to deal with months, years and timezones it all goes scary complex. So if you can't just use a single unit, such as days and need to work back and forward with dates and times, use a library written by experts. Most languages will have at least a basic time tool set, some will have fairly advanced tool sets for date/times. They provide creation of proper calendar based dates/times, adding subtracting dates and times, comparing dates and times, converting dates and times between timezones and even calendars.

As 1:45.765 is really a discrete duration however, we don't need to deal with calendars or dates, it's not that hard to convert to seconds, however to avoid loosing precision you would convert it to milliseconds. You'll figure it out ;)

venquessa
24-12-2015, 14:27
Venquessa thanks again for posting useful info. I mentioned Python here because all over the web it's described as a "comprehensive high-level scripting language", not sure what that means. What is "high-level"? You called it a utility language, can you elaborate on that a little? I really want to get my feet wet in coding, was gonna start with C but folks online say its uber hard as a first language to learn, plus that bit you posted written in C scared me to death. Most websites noted that it's more important to know what your goal is and not what language to learn first. Having said that, my goal is to write a full GUI UDP app, such as HUD dash(free android). Venquessa if you're still ready this, what do I need to know to accomplish this long term goal? What language would be the best for it? Thanks in advance!

Computer languages are classified by a number of things.

Level donates the detail at which you program and how much the language does for you implicitly. Low level languages are more focused on the computer and how it does things giving you much more direct control over stuff like memory, memory addressing, bits and bytes, numerical formats and precision, how and when to copy data, etc. etc. A High level language abstracts all of this away from you and provides you with a set of more "human" readable operations. "Print stuff", "convert number to string", "open a file", "read from a file", "ask the user something"...

In a high level language you might call "print "Hello world" and thou and behold, "Hello world" appears on the screen. Underneath "print" is a fairly huge amount of stuff that needs to be done. Hello World may be 1 high level line of code, but will result in literally thousands of lines of low level code being executed. Someone somewhere has to write that low level code.

Why would you use a high level language? Because you don't care 'how' the computer does it and you don't have the time to work it out either and doing so would be extremely tedious. Why would you use a low level language? Because you want to interact with hardware or because you want total control over exactly how the computer does what you ask for speed and efficiency. A disadvantage of a high level language is that they often spend a lot of time trying to imply what exactly you want based on what you gave it. They have to accommodate large amounts of possible paths based on their input. If you know 100% exactly what you want, you can use lower level code to speed things up and avoid all the interpretation and validation steps.

There aren't just high and low, there is a spectrum of langauges. Often you will find that they are written within each other. Python for example is written in C, C compilers are written in C also, but the original compilers where written in assembly language 'compilers' and somewhere way, way back, someone had to write the first assembler in machine code, literally binary digits.

Another classification is Interpreted versus compiled. Python is an interpreted language. When you want to run a python program you first have to run "python" itself, it will then load your script as a file and execute the lines of code in it. A compiled language like C is passed to a compiler which takes the C code and converts it into machine code which can be directly run on the target computer, a .exe file for example. A script language is usually just an interpreted language. There are pros and cons. Script languages tend to be slower as the interpreter has to process and convert the code as it runs, where as the compiled code is ready to run directly. Compiled languages are typically checked for errors before they can be compiled into executables, so basic coding errors show up quickly, where as you could have a bug in a line of a script that doesn't get executed for many months of correct operation which promptly aborts the script with a "syntax error" the first time it gets run.

Script languages tend to be quite "quick and dirty", they are not as strict and don't often allow you to lay out large amounts of code and components in a well managed way. Not compared to something like Java or C/C++ or .Net. This is why they are seldom favoured for larger application development, but are brilliant for writing quick utilities. Of course there are outliers and some fairly sizeable applications written in python or perl.

Today these lines are more and more blurred with the likes of Java and .Net being a sort of hybrid between compiled and interpreted languages.

You are totally correct that you do not start with the language and then look for things to solve with it. Well, maybe when you are just starting learning that's okay. In the real world in software development, you typically start with the requirements, the goal or the problem you are trying to solve. It's a bit like doing some DIY, you don't go the tool box, lift out a hammer and walk around the house seeing what you can hit with a hammer. Instead you decide what you want to achieve, then go to the tool box and pick out the correct tool or tools for the job. The more you have the better, especially if you want a career in software development. The more tools you have in your box the better your CV looks and the more valuable you are to a company or your team.

As to your goal. The first place to start is the platform. "free android", I assume you mean you want to develop for the android OS. This will limit and steer you towards particular tools and languages. I don't do android development, but I believe Java is supported on android. Best to follow some tutorials on andoird app development. They will suggest particular tools, editors and libraries you can use to speed up your development.

AtomicSphincter
24-12-2015, 23:55
Thanks for taking your time to post all that info! Spent a few hours last night looking up Python tutorials, it seems a lot easier then C, lol, at least for now. By saying (free android) I was trying to describe the app that I had mentioned, HUD Dash is a free android app, sorry I wasn't so clear. You're right about java being supported by android, that's what I read so far on the web. The reason I figured I'd try writing for Android, well that's what I have as my phone, so I can quickly test on the device itself. I'm wanting to learn this as a hobby, so I'm really open to anything. I've been wanting to learn how to code since I was twelve. When thirteen I had my dad buy me a book on java and a book on C. I tried to get into them, but things were so far over my head I got discouraged and quit. Fast forward fifteen years later I'm bitten by the bug again, but this time I'm not gonna quit this easily.
Anyways, Venquessa, thank you for taking your time to post explanations of how things work. I'm pretty excited about entering the world of programming, hopefully I have the smarts to keep up, lol!

venquessa
25-12-2015, 19:38
Remember software engineering is mostly:

Try, fail, try again fail, google, stack overflow, google, try, fail, try succeed, "WOoooohooo!" W00t!"... "Next!"
Try, fail, try again fail, google, stack overflow, google, try, fail, try succeed, "WOoooohooo!" W00t!"... "Next!"
Try, fail, try again fail, google, stack overflow, google, try, fail, try succeed, "WOoooohooo!" W00t!"... "Next!"
...

Use the hive mind of stack overflow and google, makes things much faster.

jimmyb_84
25-01-2016, 14:04
Remember software engineering is mostly:

Try, fail, try again fail, google, stack overflow, google, try, fail, try succeed, "WOoooohooo!" W00t!"... "Next!"
Try, fail, try again fail, google, stack overflow, google, try, fail, try succeed, "WOoooohooo!" W00t!"... "Next!"
Try, fail, try again fail, google, stack overflow, google, try, fail, try succeed, "WOoooohooo!" W00t!"... "Next!"
...

Use the hive mind of stack overflow and google, makes things much faster.

Funny you said that, as last night I attempted to create something in app form however I went without the woohoo bit.

I was trying to calculate fuel for race on a button press in swift but could I get anything to work.... no

I managed to change the area to "I pressed a button" but couldn't for life of me (and hours on Google) figure out how to get the calculation in there. May of bitten off more than I can chew. I can get the maths to work in "playground" but once I add the button I fall apart. O well more tutorials