PDA

View Full Version : Any tips on how to be consistent



Rambo_Commando
09-03-2016, 05:28
Here is the situation, I am driving with a great setup from the Pcars database (formula rookie, Sonoma Short). The author, Y22 Rydr, PB is 1:20.xxx, I've modified it a bit and ran a 1:17.715. The AI is running low 1:19.xxx, 1-2 AI drivers will sometimes post a high 1:18.xxx once in a blue moon. Come race day, I can not, for the life of me, put down consistent lap times. My times range from 1:18 to 1:23 depending what the AI are doing around me. I've been consistent for all the previous races but Sonoma is giving troubles. I'm not the type that has to win every race but based on my practice lap times I know I'll be lucky to finish in the top ten. I have the AI set to 100% in the FR World Championship and the last thing I want to do is reduce that.

Does anyone have any tips on how to be consistent on this track or in general?

Invincible
09-03-2016, 05:42
Here is the situation, I am driving with a great setup from the Pcars database (formula rookie, Sonoma Short). The author, Y22 Rydr, PB is 1:20.xxx, I've modified it a bit and ran a 1:17.715. The AI is running low 1:19.xxx, 1-2 AI drivers will sometimes post a high 1:18.xxx once in a blue moon. Come race day, I can not, for the life of me, put down consistent lap times. My times range from 1:18 to 1:23 depending what the AI are doing around me. I've been consistent for all the previous races but Sonoma is giving troubles. I'm not the type that has to win every race but based on my practice lap times I know I'll be lucky to finish in the top ten. I have the AI set to 100% in the FR World Championship and the last thing I want to do is reduce that.

Does anyone have any tips on how to be consistent on this track or in general?

Go into practice, choose track and car and drive. Try not to put down the fastest lap possible, but try to stay in a specific window, like 1:19.xxx for starters. Do that 10 laps consecutively, then put down your target by 0.5 s and so on.

Rambo_Commando
09-03-2016, 06:13
Go into practice, choose track and car and drive. Try not to put down the fastest lap possible, but try to stay in a specific window, like 1:19.xxx for starters. Do that 10 laps consecutively, then put down your target by 0.5 s and so on.

Yeah I think that's my problem. I'm trying to get those 1:17's right out the gate.

balderz002
09-03-2016, 09:28
Some good suggestions here:

http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?45422-Its-finally-clicked-(Yes-clicked-not-clucked!-)

I try and go for braking points (and the gears i should be in) more than trying to get green in the sectors. I changed my hud to remove the sector splits as it distracted me, and gave me a false point to aim for over a lap.

It made me want to brake a little later, or carry a bit more speed thruogh a corner than I knew I should have, to try and push and get the - time in the splits.

DreamsKnight
09-03-2016, 10:32
Learn the TRACK. And i mean: 10000km.

Raven403
09-03-2016, 12:08
Also, it should be stated, the Track conditions change depending on TOD and session. Also, when you racing other cars, (Maybe less so in a FR) there is a degree of washout on the Downforce when your behind other cars, meaning your car may not handle like it does in TT or practice, just something to consider. I also find it difficult to be consistent with the AI in this game, atleast until they spread out a bit.

Yorkie065
09-03-2016, 12:36
When dealing with traffic, whether it's lapped or a battle for position, your lap times are always going to fluctuate depending on the events of that lap, how quick the drivers are around you and the conditions of the circuit. Chasing another car or running around a second behind another car is where you want very very consistent lap times, and if the car infront is consistent too, you can keep focusing on being consistent up to the point you're essentially lining yourself up for an overtake. You know your optimum pace or fastest lap, and if you can do a few laps (not necessarily strung together) that are in and around that pace on the limit, you have an "ultimate" reference. For races, you want to be 90-95% to that ultimate pace with the focus being on nailing braking points, nailing apex and not unsettling the car. All of them are key, but if you can keep the car under control, not locking brakes, stepping out the rear or losing traction on exits, it's a lot easier to be consistent lap on lap. Essentially you don't want to be taking any risks, driving within your limit and just letting the times come to you rather than hunting for the time. If you can hit the braking points and nail the apexes everytime, naturally the difference in lap times is going to decrease, your driving tidies up and you'll find the consistent lap times you're after.

A lot of people want to go in and bang quali lap after quali lap. You can keep it up for a few laps without too much of an issue but at some point you're going to push that little bit too far and cost yourself anywhere between half a second to more than 10 depending on the severity of the incident the mistake causes. It's part of that risk vs reward. Do 10 laps in a row all 0.3 seconds off your ultimate pace or do every lap with the car on a knife edge with the potential for a lot of time loss. I'd also advise that a good stable setup is key for consistency. Some people go for outright pace which is fine if they can keep the car there, but if you can create a stable platform for yourself to drive with, your confidence will increase and lost time will be made up with being able to push the car a little and trust it. Consistency will trump outright pace, and the longer the race is, the more consistency will be as the bigger factor....but obviously, with some element of pace still being there :p

F1_Racer68
09-03-2016, 12:53
Yep Yorkie nailed it.

Consistency is all about finding the rhythm of the track. Once you can find it it will be much easier to be consistent. Run a practice session and forget about being super fast. Just try and get a feel for the rhythm of the track. That will bring consistency and consistency will bring speed.

The other big factor in being consistent is being smooth. If you have a tendancy to jam on the brakes or stomp on the throttle or snap the steering wheel you will be more prone to making mistakes that result in laps that are unrepeatable.

Be smooth and find the rhythm. To quote Cool Runnings.... "Feel the rhythm! Feel the rhyme!"

RacingManiac
09-03-2016, 13:09
I find also trying to relax when you can helps too. Its easy to get the red mist to set in and you start death gripping the wheel. I've been trying to get myself to just take a deep breath every few laps, stretch and flex my fingers on the straight and make that into a routine.

Diamond_Eyes
09-03-2016, 14:15
229467

ramm21
09-03-2016, 18:11
If you want to really learn a track, or a track/car combo, one of the best pieces of advice I got was to split the track into sections based on the curves. Fast corners go into one category, slow into another. Or you could pick the 2 or 3 corners that lead onto the longest straights, or an "esses" part of the track could be a section.

After you decide which sections you want to roll with, pick your first section and try to hit it as perfectly as you can. At first just try to maintain your line, add speed as you get more and more laps in.

Lets say you want to work on the fast corners. Hit the first one, and before your next one reflect on what you did right/wrong, what you can do next time to better your line, maintain more speed, whatever. It works best if you pick corners or sections on the opposite side of the track, so you can think about the previous one or the next one in between. Of course, you want to keep a decent pace through the section you aren't working on, but not so much so that it sucks up your attention from the corners you want to focus on.

When I first started out, I took the road cars to snetterton 100. Its a short, simple track. I started by hitting the two slowest corners, the 180 ones at the opposite ends of the course. After a while, I got a good sense of speed at every point, from turn in to exit. I started to feel the corners more, build confidence, and then at some point I realized I wasn't even consciously thinking about the sections I'm working on anymore, I just knew what I did wrong as I was doing it.

Or you can just turn on ABS, traction and stability control. That will definitely make you more consistent at the expense of covering up minor mistakes. :D

kevin kirk
09-03-2016, 19:12
Drive thur corners in the way that your ready to get on the gas at the apex of the corner. Dont still be on the brakes at the apex. Back up your braking zones, stay in a higher gear and float it into the corner. Diving deep into braking zones will just have you slaming down gears just trying to stop the car causing lower speeds. Floating it in with early braking means less braking allowing a higher gear means more speed thur the corner then allowing you to be back on the gas at every apex. Apex back on gas, apex back on gas, apex back on gas.

Rambo_Commando
09-03-2016, 19:14
Thanks for all the help folks. You really gotta love this forum. So after reading all this I hit the track again tweaking my setup and drove about 70+ laps I managed to run in the low 1:19's for 8 laps straight. I decided to take a break and was reading some stuff on the forum about fov's and such...I went back to my game and moved the seat position all the way back, then I adjusted my fov so that the edge of my side mirrors are just touching the edge of my tv screen. I like to see my mirrors at all times in open wheel cars. After making that fov adjustment I went back to Sonoma and put down 12 straight laps in the low 1:18's. I think FOV plays a role in putting down consistent lap times. Once again, thanks for all the help.

Panopticism
09-03-2016, 20:23
Make sure you have an established set of landmarks. If you have a specific set of braking and turn-in points, it is much easier to execute lap after lap within a narrow laptime window. Additionally, braking and turning in at the same points each lap will help you recognize tire wear and brake fade.

Ptyochromis
10-03-2016, 03:35
Also, set your brake vents / brake pressure so your brakes aren't getting too cool on long straights and too hot in heavy braking sections.

hkraft300
10-03-2016, 09:40
Keep calm and race your own race.
We're not pro's. They'll lap within .2 of a second lap after lap, which is maybe .2 seconds off the car's ultimate pace.

Mahjik
10-03-2016, 17:59
Make sure you have an established set of landmarks. If you have a specific set of braking and turn-in points, it is much easier to execute lap after lap within a narrow laptime window. A

This...

This is exactly where the professionals earn their money. Plenty of people can be fast over a single lap, but to be consistent over every lap takes a ton of focus and concentration. You need to have visual queues for your braking, turn-in and exit points to be able to hit them every lap.

kevin kirk
10-03-2016, 18:28
This...

This is exactly where the professionals earn their money. Plenty of people can be fast over a single lap, but to be consistent over every lap takes a ton of focus and concentration. You need to have visual queues for your braking, turn-in and exit points to be able to hit them every lap......as much as I try to do that it seems that with traffic, not to mention fuel load and tires falling off, makes the landmarkers change from lap to lap according to the situation . Just passing cars makes me brake at different places.

ramm21
10-03-2016, 20:23
.....as much as I try to do that it seems that with traffic, not to mention fuel load and tires falling off, makes the landmarkers change from lap to lap according to the situation . Just passing cars makes me brake at different places.

I pick 2 markers, one on each side for my braking point, that way if you're trying to pass a car, you still have a point of reference that the car doesn't block. Make sure it isn't a shadow or something that would change based on time. And don't rely on brake markers that are sitting on the ground. Cars blow those up too often. Can't tell you how many times I braked at the "second marker," only to completely blow the corner. Then you realize that the first marker got blown up by another racer. I only use brake markers that are hung up. Advertizement signs, rumble strips, etc.. are also good.

I don't really use turn in landmarks, as my eyes are looking at the apex when I start turning in. I just rely on sense of speed. I figure if I got the braking point right, and I turn in at the same speed every lap, my turn in point should be about the same for all those laps.

DECATUR PLAYA
10-03-2016, 20:43
.....as much as I try to do that it seems that with traffic, not to mention fuel load and tires falling off, makes the landmarkers change from lap to lap according to the situation . Just passing cars makes me brake at different places.

Racing and running qualifying laps is 2 very different things. When in traffic you should be racing your opponents and not worrying about consistency. Consistency in a race comes when your running in space but when racing an opponent more times than not your times will be slower than running by yourself. As far as tires and fuel you can only be as consistent as the car allows. If the tires are gone then pushing toward your faster lap times is bad strategy because sooner or later you going to push over the edge.

kevin kirk
10-03-2016, 20:55
Racing and running qualifying laps is 2 very different things. When in traffic you should be racing your opponents and not worrying about consistency. Consistency in a race comes when your running in space but when racing an opponent more times than not your times will be slower than running by yourself. As far as tires and fuel you can only be as consistent as the car allows. If the tires are gone then pushing toward your faster lap times is bad strategy because sooner or later you going to push over the edge.....I just try to be ready to be back on the gas at the apex. Whats catching me out is I can be super consistant that way but being prepared and off the gas so early in the corner means I'm using less brake, and staying a higher gear carrying more speed into the corner. According to if the track is clock wise or anti clock wise that sides front tire is taking more abuse and is hurting my long runs.

ramm21
10-03-2016, 21:15
....I just try to be ready to be back on the gas at the apex. Whats catching me out is I can be super consistant that way but being prepared and off the gas so early in the corner means I'm using less brake, and staying a higher gear carrying more speed into the corner. According to if the track is clock wise or anti clock wise that sides front tire is taking more abuse and is hurting my long runs.

Try pushing harder in corners where your tire that gets most abuse is on your inside. It seems for me when I run on tracks that are heavily biased on one corner I usually try to make up for it by pushing hard on the opposite side. That way, the tires wear more evenly, and your car is a little more balanced when the tires are on their last laps.

Mahjik
10-03-2016, 23:15
When in traffic you should be racing your opponents and not worrying about consistency.

This is true to a point. However, you always need to know your braking, turn-in and exit points regardless of traffic. This is why many (inexperienced) online racers run into other drivers in the braking zones. They are focused on "racing" the other cars and have no idea where their braking points are which has them overshoot.

DECATUR PLAYA
10-03-2016, 23:48
This is true to a point. However, you always need to know your braking, turn-in and exit points regardless of traffic. This is why many (inexperienced) online racers run into other drivers in the braking zones. They are focused on "racing" the other cars and have no idea where their braking points are which has them overshoot.

Good point.

hkraft300
11-03-2016, 00:03
Lap times and consistency? Pffft...
In traffic I'm just trying to survive and not be a complete F* up.
I can feel the AI looking at me thinking "00101010110101000101010100!"

Shogun613
11-03-2016, 00:43
Also practice threshold braking. You want to be gradually coming off of the brake at the same rate as you are slowing down. It takes a few laps to get into the rhythm of doing it successfully at each track, but when you do it right you can pick up those valuable tenths of a second in each corner that requires it.

3800racingfool
11-03-2016, 02:56
Some good suggestions here:

http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?45422-Its-finally-clicked-(Yes-clicked-not-clucked!-)

I try and go for braking points (and the gears i should be in) more than trying to get green in the sectors. I changed my hud to remove the sector splits as it distracted me, and gave me a false point to aim for over a lap.

It made me want to brake a little later, or carry a bit more speed thruogh a corner than I knew I should have, to try and push and get the - time in the splits.

Are you talking about the little green/red splits that appear in the center of the screen each sector? If so, how the heck do you get rid of those things? I like having my gear/tire display available but those stupid split things are so distracting and, like you say, they're more apt to screw you up by making you overcommit on a lap than actually help. I just can't find anywhere in the settings where I can remove the damn things.

Panopticism
11-03-2016, 03:27
Good way to stay consistent in traffic is to familiarize yourself with the braking, turn-in, and apex points for several different lines for each corner. Most basically, you can take early apexes, traditional apexes, and late apexes. Each style will require different braking, turn-in, and apex points. You should try to find at least a couple lines through each corner, because you will be forced to adapt sooner or later.

Ideally, you will be able to take each corner a variety of ways without dramatically reducing your lap time.

Once you figure it out on one or two tracks, it should become intuitive.

hkraft300
11-03-2016, 04:05
+1 ^
Some tracks like Zhuhai I've dragged down a straight on the outside with another in MP, braked early and pulled the undercut move to get ahead at the exit ;)

Its not always about who brakes last

pollinho123
11-03-2016, 09:25
Another important thing is to be aware of your own driving style. It helped me a lot to watch my own replays, because you actually can learn quite a lot of things about your own driving, that you don't notice when driving. Besides one huge thing (I discovered, that nearly all of my major mistakes happen after I got overtaken) I could also judge my line better and learn where I was consistent and where not.

Worth a try, I guess :)

hkraft300
11-03-2016, 10:58
Even watching yourself with telemetry on maybe, to compare someone faster or where you're going wrong.
I've had guys watch me do laps and give me tips that's certainly helped make me faster and more consistent. Next step would be watching my own laps.
Maybe in pcars2 with better replays :p

Yorkie065
11-03-2016, 11:22
On the lines of watching others to learn, do not disregard slower people and their lines either! You can learn a lot from slower people with things like alternate lines, lines through a corner that might actually be quicker than your own, and also a good idea of where other people will be braking when it comes to overtaking and battling with other cars. The more you know about other people and how they drive, the easier it is to overtake and defend against them.

jeneric
11-03-2016, 19:54
I can give you loads of tips on how to be consistently bad if you like?:D

jimmyb_84
11-03-2016, 22:13
Just did a 30min race at Dubai on the GP track in the McLaren GT3 and I managed this....

229650

I think having a easy to drive setup help and decent tyre pressure too I was racing on soft compound with 42c temp tyres were around 98-107c mostly around 100c

hkraft300
11-03-2016, 23:02
^+1 top stuff Jim.
Very important note too: easy to drive setup and not a knife edge thing will go a long way.

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
11-03-2016, 23:05
In the long term (and I'm talking nearly 20 years long term on my part) I can only recommend this: Learn how to drive cars that are not set up the way you want. Learn to make an understeery car turn in. Learn to make an oversteery car settle down. Figure out ways to extract speed out of cars that misbehave. Get comfortable on and close to the limit (i.e. learn to drift). Make yourself into a driver that can adjust to a car instead of a driver who needs a car adjusted to them. More than anything, enjoy a challenge, love to just drive.

Practice.

Practice.

Practice.

Ptyochromis
13-03-2016, 01:17
Zuhai, IMO is a b*tch to be consistent on. Screaming up to the first turn at over 150 in the F-A, if you miss the brake point by 0.5 seconds you are already way off. Then you are holding the brake longer to keep yourself off the grass and to manage the inevitable under-steer which then puts your brake temp higher when you exit. This higher brake temp then increases your chances of over-heating by the end of the lap, putting your other brake points into question.

I can do laps of watkins glen within 0.2 of eachother but i struggle to get (fast) laps of Zhuhai within 3 sec of eachother lol.

Jussi Viljami Karjalainen
13-03-2016, 13:33
Screaming up to the first turn at over 150 in the F-A, if you miss the brake point by 0.5 seconds you are already way off.Yeah, about 33-34 meters off. =)

0.5 seconds is a year in terms of braking accuracy, at those speeds missing even by 0.1 seconds will put you nearly 7 meters further down the track before you can effectively turn in.

The_GrinchWT
14-03-2016, 08:26
Here is the situation, I am driving with a great setup from the Pcars database (formula rookie, Sonoma Short). The author, Y22 Rydr, PB is 1:20.xxx, I've modified it a bit and ran a 1:17.715. The AI is running low 1:19.xxx, 1-2 AI drivers will sometimes post a high 1:18.xxx once in a blue moon. Come race day, I can not, for the life of me, put down consistent lap times. My times range from 1:18 to 1:23 depending what the AI are doing around me. I've been consistent for all the previous races but Sonoma is giving troubles. I'm not the type that has to win every race but based on my practice lap times I know I'll be lucky to finish in the top ten. I have the AI set to 100% in the FR World Championship and the last thing I want to do is reduce that.

Does anyone have any tips on how to be consistent on this track or in general?To your question specifically at Sonoma short, that's a really hard track to master. That's why it's so fun. The 2 off-camber corners right off the bat scare a lot of people away. The most important thing is finding cars that are easy for you to keep under control. Forgot what car has better stats, because you'll be fighting the car and doubting yourself instead of learning the track. You're in luck though. There are convenient braking points all over the place. Learn your braking points then figure out what gear you should be in to take that corner. Talking about gears, this is one of those tracks where you'll have to short shift a few corner exits or you'll spin right around. With cars that have a lot of downforce you can take the second half of the track at full throttle all the way up to the last hairpin. You just need to find the right lines through there.

I'm in the top 5-10 in all the classes, except stock car, at Sonoma short (Ps4 leaderboards). Send me a friend request and I'll gladly walk you through the track.

hkraft300
14-03-2016, 21:18
Zuhai, IMO is a b*tch to be consistent on.

But Zhuhai brake markers are easy to spot.
Tried Hockenheim classic in a fast car (Formula/LMP)? The brake markers or anything significant is far off the track and, PS4 lacking 4K goodness I find it hard to spot amongst the trackside wilderness make a hash of it 1/5 times.
And then there's that 2nd chicane...

Ptyochromis
28-03-2016, 17:37
But Zhuhai brake markers are easy to spot.
Tried Hockenheim classic in a fast car (Formula/LMP)? The brake markers or anything significant is far off the track and, PS4 lacking 4K goodness I find it hard to spot amongst the trackside wilderness make a hash of it 1/5 times.
And then there's that 2nd chicane...

It depends on what you use for a braking point. For turn one, I use a white line that runs across the track as my brake point. Sorta hard to see with traffic but still easier than trying to guess when you are at X point between distance markers.