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View Full Version : The Default Setup question.



NemethR
11-08-2016, 19:24
I have driven all cars, that are in the game (+some mod cars too), on my 7 favorite European racetracks, to see how they compare to each other.
Now I am doing the same on 4 US tracks and Bathurst.
(So 12 tracks alltogether.)

I really enjoy doing this, and I must say, I am amazed how different the cars are in the game, not only the looks of them, but the sound, and most importantly the feeling of the cars. This really shows how Project Cars is a great simulation. (The best I have tried.)


Yet i have been wondering, while I was driving the Sauber C9 Mercedes - one of my absolute favorites in the game - how have the default setups been chosen for the cars?

What I mean, is, some cars, have a near perfect default setup (like the: Sauber C9 Mercedes, Mclaren MP4-12c GT3, Lotus 98T Renault, Ford Mustang Boss GT4, Ford Focus RS, Audi R8 V10 Plus, and a lot more)...

Yet some cars have a plain wrong default setup. (like: Mclaren P1, almost impossible to drive fast, Pagani Roadster, constantly having to balance the car under braking, because the rear wants to overtake the front, Ginetta G40 Junior, way too unstable on downshifts, the original default setup of the Bentley GT3, Marek cars, way too slow, with default, compared to the other LMP2, LMP1 cars, and some others.)

Now I know, that this is mostly subjective, but one would think, that the cars should have a similar default setup in the game, yet its like random :D

So I would really like to know, how have the default setups been choosen for the cars?

Konan
11-08-2016, 19:33
Quite amazing...i was thinking about starting a thread with the same question only yesterday...:cool:

havocc
11-08-2016, 20:30
Regarding P1 (from web)

Brake-based LSDs
These are often confused for e-diffs but operate in a completely different manner; they’re more of a traction control strategy than a true limited-slip differential. Whereas e-diffs use sensors and actuators to control a mechanical LSD, brake-based systems use the basic operation of an open diff to their advantage.

As was discussed in part one, open diffs distribute torque 50:50 to each wheel on the driven axle. If one of the wheels is spinning and wasting useful torque (on ice, say, or under high lateral acceleration), the individual brake on that side of the axle can provide enough resistance to trick the open diff into providing more torque to the wheel with more grip.

Such systems are often, but by no means exclusively, found on powerful front-wheel-drive cars (for example the second-gen Mini GP) and while they can feel artificial and inconsistent compared to a mechanical LSD, when executed well, they can be extraordinarily effective – as the McLaren P1 (below) has ably demonstrated.

I think it depends on the fact that this kind of diff can't be properly simulated in game

Markus Ott
11-08-2016, 21:31
I don't know how exactly they come up with the setups, but I can tell you that basicly all of them are too soft and ride height is too high for most of the tracks as the basic setup is supposed to work on even the bumpiest tracks in the game.

NemethR
12-08-2016, 08:11
I don't know how exactly they come up with the setups, but I can tell you that basicly all of them are too soft and ride height is too high for most of the tracks as the basic setup is supposed to work on even the bumpiest tracks in the game.

True, but most cars can be driven quite fast, and are stable enough even with the default, yet some, are very hard to drive.

I would imagine, that the default setup would be something that results in the car being relatively neutral to drive, as is the case with a lot of cars, yet some are really hard to even keep on the road with the defaults.