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Zpectre87
19-09-2016, 17:52
I've reached that point in the game that separates men from boys... Fully manual race and road cars.

Problem is like this: I "know" how to heel and toe, but my movement doesn't seem to be perfect because the rev match isn't "smooth", sometimes the engine bounces off the rev limiter, sometimes the RPM drop after the blip is too abrupt, and finally other times my right foot gets stuck in the throttle. I'm also having trouble blipping the throttle while still being smooth with my braking.

Another question I have is with regards to the downshifts. Which is the "right" way if on 5th and heading into a 2nd gear corner? Directly from 5th to 2nd or 5-4-3-2?

Finally, I use G27 pedals but they're sitting on a ceramic floor and they slide backwards if I'm too aggressive with my movements. How can I minimize this issue? The rubber things at the bottom can't stop the slide. :(

Roger Prynne
19-09-2016, 18:19
Finally, I use G27 pedals but they're sitting on a ceramic floor and they slide backwards if I'm too aggressive with my movements. How can I minimize this issue? The rubber things at the bottom can't stop the slide.
Velcro? the wide type.

Konan
19-09-2016, 18:46
...or a wheelstand...

bradleyland
19-09-2016, 18:49
Using pedals on tile is a real pain. What I recommend is building a base that you mount your pedals to, then put your grips on the base. I'm building plans to do something similar with my T3PA pedals. I'm going to mount them to a piece of 1/4" plywood, then screw an array of nine grippy feet to the plywood. I'm also going to put a small eyelet on the edge closest to my chair, to which I'll affix a strap that keeps the pedals from sliding away from me. The grippy feet will be solely to keep the pedals from rotating.

The alternative is to pick up a wheelstand. I'd love to do that, but I attach my wheel to a desk, so a wheelstand just doesn't fit the ergonomics of my home office.

Zpectre87
19-09-2016, 21:32
Thanks! I'd really, really love a wheelstand, but, like bradleyland, I use my wheel in my home office. I was thinking about transforming the office into a games room, though, because it's barely used for its purpose nowadays. :D

Roger, velcro seems an interesting solution, but how do I attach it to the floor?

Finally, what about my other questions? I guess that's down to practice, then? I drive stick daily but never raced cars with sticks. Manual feels nice but perhaps the McLaren F1 isn't the best learning car in the world, great a drive as it is.

aleph99
19-09-2016, 22:18
A simple solution is to tie the pedal base to your chair.

hkraft300
20-09-2016, 00:32
I'd go 5-3-1 or 5-2 with an aggressive blip.
I'm having the same trouble too with my pedal base moving so my braking becomes inconsistent. Once its secure you'll be better with braking. Also you might want to adjust your pedals so you can be smoother/ more consistent with heel-toe, maybe practice in your daily commute too.

TheBadBoyRay
20-09-2016, 01:34
Should you always blip on downshift or is it only with certain cars? I don't have a clutch pedal and use paddle shifters if that affects anything.

Y22 Rydr
20-09-2016, 01:42
On the bottom of the plywood you can use that rubbery stuff people place in their kitchen cabinets. There are also items used for furniture which will work.

Roger Prynne
20-09-2016, 01:42
Thanks! I'd really, really love a wheelstand, but, like bradleyland, I use my wheel in my home office. I was thinking about transforming the office into a games room, though, because it's barely used for its purpose nowadays. :D

Roger, velcro seems an interesting solution, but how do I attach it to the floor?

Finally, what about my other questions? I guess that's down to practice, then? I drive stick daily but never raced cars with sticks. Manual feels nice but perhaps the McLaren F1 isn't the best learning car in the world, great a drive as it is.

It's got a very sticky back that sticks to anything.

hkraft300
20-09-2016, 02:47
Should you always blip on downshift or is it only with certain cars? I don't have a clutch pedal and use paddle shifters if that affects anything.

In that case turn on auto-clutch and let the game sort it out for you, when you drive h-pattern cars.

Zpectre87
20-09-2016, 13:42
I'd go 5-3-1 or 5-2 with an aggressive blip.
I'm having the same trouble too with my pedal base moving so my braking becomes inconsistent. Once its secure you'll be better with braking. Also you might want to adjust your pedals so you can be smoother/ more consistent with heel-toe, maybe practice in your daily commute too.

The standard G27 pedals are actually a lot better than in my car, in my econobox the throttle sits a bit lower than the brake so it's hard to do while braking, and also I usually drive with a pair of tennis shoes which are too bulky for footwork.

hkraft300
20-09-2016, 16:39
If you can manage in your tennis shoes + econobox, you'll kill it with a G27.
G29 pedals > my Polo pedals and I manage fine even with ragged old safety boots.
First you figure out where / how to place your foot comfortably and getting in the habit.
The clutch /timing and smoothness comes after.
Practice makes perfect.

Can't wait to get the H-shifter. I can't do it with the paddles :(

Zpectre87
20-09-2016, 21:02
lol you also own a Polo. :D

I don't know which model is yours, but in my 9n3 I find it quite difficult to move as I'm quite big myself. I'll keep trying, though.

The velcro suggested by Roger helped a lot. The pedals are very firmly attached to the floor now, hopefully for a long time.

MrTulip
20-09-2016, 21:03
To achieve blip during downshifts I first had to relearn to brake with the right foot. And not to lose control of the car while doing so, eg. without the possibility to tiptoe with both brake and throttle in succession in fast pace to balance the car.

Of course this is something I've been doing in a real car all my life, but for some reason it felt completely unnatural in sims.

Anyway, a good car to practice this is RUF Yellowbird with the Denloc tyres. No, really. The logic is this: Denlocs lack most of the lift-off oversteer (compared to other tyres) but otherwise slide so much that you have to start braking very early on. While doing so you have plenty of time to find feel and effect of the brakes and play around with the blip. Also the Yellowbird does not grind gears easily and it does not run out of power with the wrong gear, so you don't have to concentrate too much with the stick.

hpiguy
20-09-2016, 21:30
I'll second the plywood, worked great on my first setup before upgrading pretty much everything.

http://i.imgur.com/9YBfFEZ.jpg

konnos
22-09-2016, 09:22
You can also get a carpet large enough to sit your desk, chair and pedals on it. It will be a lot harder to slide pedal on it, although i don't have a G27, usually they have something underneath to grab onto a carpet, like the DFGT has.

Zpectre87
22-09-2016, 13:45
You can also get a carpet large enough to sit your desk, chair and pedals on it. It will be a lot harder to slide pedal on it, although i don't have a G27, usually they have something underneath to grab onto a carpet, like the DFGT has.

The G27 has a small board with spikes underneath to hook onto surfaces. Works good for carpet and rubber but useless for hard surfaces.

It is, in fact, a great idea to use a carpet, though I'm allergic to dust so...

Now, what I think I can do is to grab a small carpet to place the pedals on, and use the velcro to glue the carpet on the floor...

Roger Prynne
22-09-2016, 15:21
You could also use 6" nails :highly_amused:

konnos
22-09-2016, 16:22
Now why didn't I think of that?...