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View Full Version : FOV settings will make you faster? I don't get it.



Sgt_PussaySniffer
09-08-2017, 23:57
I just bought a rig after years of playing on a homemade monstrous converted laptop table. Generally I've ranged from 10ft + to more recently for the last few years maybe 5- 6ft away from the TV.

What a difference a rig makes with the screen so close.

I've bought the screen mount had a couple of nights playing with the fov settings using calculators and latter my preferences. I'm guessing the calculators I used were designed for triple screens as I couldn't see where the hell the track went let alone be faster.

What's the problem having a higher setting and being able to see into and through the corners thus planning your lines ?

Can someone explain what I'm missing here please

hkraft300
10-08-2017, 01:35
With a single screen it becomes restrictive, but as I've moved closer to real FoV my lap times have improved, with sacrificing side vision.
My FoV still isn't correct but a little compromise.

Natural FoV helps with depth and speed perception/judgement. Try to be close, if not exact.

Chomps_McGee
10-08-2017, 03:08
This is a pretty nifty site for helping to figure out a good FOV setting. http://www.projectimmersion.com/fov/index.php

Roger Prynne
10-08-2017, 10:32
Also don't forget that pCARS uses a Horizontal FOV, so a lot of the FOV calculators wont be correct if they only use a Vertical FOV.

Olijke Poffer
10-08-2017, 13:46
Also don't forget that pCARS uses a Horizontal FOV, so a lot of the FOV calculators wont be correct if they only use a Vertical FOV.

Never knew this.. is there a known horizontal fov calculator link?

Bealdor
10-08-2017, 13:48
Never knew this.. is there a known horizontal fov calculator link?

Just look two posts above yours. ;)

poirqc
12-08-2017, 02:16
I can't explain why because it's late and i'm tired.

When i sent my FoV from around 80 to 57, i found that it was alot easier to chase a car closer. I would also be able to react and brake better without ramming the guy in front.

hkraft300
12-08-2017, 03:38
I don't think the lack of peripheral vision is an issue. You'll still hit your marks and find yourself faster.
It's a little harder when you're wheel to wheel, you have to be a touch careful and a bit of guesswork if there's a car next to you.

But I'll fully agree with poirqc. My theory is that because you're closer to a natural FoV you can judge distance and speed better, so it allows you to race closer.

poirqc
12-08-2017, 10:54
I don't think the lack of peripheral vision is an issue. You'll still hit your marks and find yourself faster.
It's a little harder when you're wheel to wheel, you have to be a touch careful and a bit of guesswork if there's a car next to you.

But I'll fully agree with poirqc. My theory is that because you're closer to a natural FoV you can judge distance and speed better, so it allows you to race closer.

Anyone with a driver's license should already have spacial awereness anyway. You already need that skill in traffic. So not seeing things isn't that big of an issue.

That's where the helmet view, with look to apex, really helps with a lower FoV. You can clearly see the apex(or the whole curve, really) where you're turning.

hkraft300
12-08-2017, 11:16
Anyone with a driver's license should already have spacial awereness anyway. You already need that skill in traffic. So not seeing things isn't that big of an issue.

That's where the helmet view, with look to apex, really helps with a lower FoV. You can clearly see the apex(or the whole curve, really) where you're turning.

Not if you're driving the R18 TDi :rolleyes:

Train your spacial awareness by racing that.

Mahjik
12-08-2017, 15:55
Anyone with a driver's license should already have spacial awereness anyway. You already need that skill in traffic. So not seeing things isn't that big of an issue.

Having spatial awareness for traffic is completely different than spatial awareness for racing. Driving on a highway where everyone has predefined traffic lines and rules is a lot different than racing with someone that is less than 2ft away from your race car.



As for the FOV, most people don't realize that when they go with a FOV which increases speed that it decreases their accuracy. Things will happen faster and as a driver, you'll have less precision. Granted, at the end of the day, any sim is a "game" in which it's meant for entertainment so people will adjust the FOV for their needs. However, if competition is desired, the lower the better.

Rambo_Commando
12-08-2017, 15:59
I can't explain why because it's late and i'm tired.

When i sent my FoV from around 80 to 57, i found that it was alot easier to chase a car closer. I would also be able to react and brake better without ramming the guy in front.

This is true. On a single screen setup an fov of 55-60 is best. Anything lower and your stepping into three screen territory.

poirqc
13-08-2017, 13:53
Having spatial awareness for traffic is completely different than spatial awareness for racing. Driving on a highway where everyone has predefined traffic lines and rules is a lot different than racing with someone that is less than 2ft away from your race car.



As for the FOV, most people don't realize that when they go with a FOV which increases speed that it decreases their accuracy. Things will happen faster and as a driver, you'll have less precision. Granted, at the end of the day, any sim is a "game" in which it's meant for entertainment so people will adjust the FOV for their needs. However, if competition is desired, the lower the better.

I wouldn't call both completely different. Points are shared, imo. But that's a whole another topic anyway. ;)

Mahjik
13-08-2017, 14:35
I wouldn't call both completely different. Points are shared, imo. But that's a whole another topic anyway. ;)

Don't take this as attacking because it's not, but have you done a competition school or side-by-side drills on a real track?

poirqc
13-08-2017, 22:45
Don't take this as attacking because it's not, but have you done a competition school or side-by-side drills on a real track?

There's no attacks, it's a discussion. ;)

I never competed or drove anything fancy. But i did rent-a-kart, almost weekly, for couple years, with some friends. Some of them could match the track's best time. Couple of us were about of equal skill. You have to know your surroundings and how the other one drives because it'll end in a wreck if not.

While i didn't do side-by-side drills extensively, it did happend a few times(That's the only thing that brought me back to sim racing).

Quite often, here in Québec, people drive really fast in winter. Around 130 Km/h when it's -30°C or when there's snowfall. Often you need to react quickly because it goes from smooth sailing to cluster**** in a second.

Imo, spacial aweness is about dealing with what you don't see. To ultimately avoid a crash if a situation occurs. While it shouldn't happen in everyday drives, it eventually does.

Mahjik
14-08-2017, 01:24
There's no attacks, it's a discussion. ;)

No worries. If you get the chance, do a course or something similar. Even for someone like me who had been doing performance driving and time trials (with open passing) for years, being able to race in close quarters with another car (or more than one car) was a huge learning curve. When you are strapped into a race car with a harness and a head/neck restraint, your visibility is severely limited. The other drivers don't care if you can or cannot see them and you don't want the expense of getting your race car damaged (unless you are a paid driver in which you don't care about that aspect ;) ). You also have to keep racing your line and hitting your marks, as well as pay attention to the corner stations to make sure you don't blow any flags.. It's a lot to process all at one time. :disillusionment:

It's just a whole different type of awareness that is needed for racing which doesn't translate well to street driving. Karting is closer.

hkraft300
14-08-2017, 02:42
It's just a whole different type of awareness that is needed for racing which doesn't translate well to street driving. Karting is closer.

Doesn't it?
I'd argue it's made you a better driver on the street and the track training benefits you.
The ability to anticipate driver movements (inattentive texter), watching flags (street signs/lights), nagging pit crew (wife)... ;)

Just a theory.

Olijke Poffer
15-08-2017, 07:57
This is a pretty nifty site for helping to figure out a good FOV setting. http://www.projectimmersion.com/fov/index.php

Something wrong with this calculator? When I press calculate fov, nothing happens. I turned off, add blocker, turned of pop up blockers etc. Tried it in IE and Chrome but nothing.
Is it just me or does it currently not work.

Fanapryde
15-08-2017, 08:44
sorry, double post... :o

Fanapryde
15-08-2017, 08:46
Something wrong with this calculator? When I press calculate fov, nothing happens. I turned off, add blocker, turned of pop up blockers etc. Tried it in IE and Chrome but nothing.
Is it just me or does it currently not work.

If necessary, click the Flash player icon, then the calculator will show.

Olijke Poffer
16-08-2017, 06:32
The page works. I can alter the settings etc. But when I press the "calculate FOV" button, nothing happens. No result, nothing.

Treid several computers and browsers. Non of them will give me a FOV result.

Is somebody here willing to give me the correct FOV for my setup,
http://www.projectimmersion.com/fov/

Monitor: Single
Ratio: 16:9
Units: cm
Projectcars hFOV
Screensize: 55inch
View distance: 110cm

Thanks....

Silraed
16-08-2017, 07:50
58 would be your correct FOV.

Olijke Poffer
21-08-2017, 13:07
58 would be your correct FOV.

Cool thanks. Sorry for the late response. Some busy times here. But thanks for the help of course..
Grab yourself a beer on my account. Bottoms up.

Silraed
21-08-2017, 13:30
Cheers :D