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View Full Version : [MAYBE] PC1 vs PC2 Physics Will PC1 setups work?



Dynomight Motorsports
26-09-2017, 14:10
I realize the tire models have changed, but has the basic physics in the game changed. Has anyone else tried running Same Car and Track from PC1 on PC2, Results? I used the Merc AMG GT3 in PC1 throughout league racing and was not really impressed with the car. However, the car seems to be up to the challenge in PC2. What are you thoughts or things you have noticed in Comparison? Also I don't understand the Rear Diff Settings, still seems a bit confusing after reading the descriptions.

Bealdor
26-09-2017, 14:18
http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?52783-Magic-inside!-Need-Help-With-Differentials&p=1367069&viewfull=1#post1367069

Jussi Karjalainen
26-09-2017, 14:21
Short answer is "not directly".

Our damper modeling has been improved (not that there were massive problems in pCARS 1 but every little bit helps), our slow->fast damper transitions are now force based rather than velocity based, many cars have 3rd springs and dampers, the differentials behave and transmit forces way more accurately than before, etc. You can get good results by plonking in the numbers from pC1, but unless you happen to be lucky they won't act the same.

Some help will be provided by the new setup calculator I'm releasing later this week.

AbeWoz
26-09-2017, 14:42
Jussi, are you guys going to update the projectcarsetups.eu site that your calculator is apart of?

Bealdor
26-09-2017, 15:11
Jussi, are you guys going to update the projectcarsetups.eu site that your calculator is apart of?

http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?32940-A-new-home-for-all-your-setups&p=1362755&viewfull=1#post1362755

Dynomight Motorsports
26-09-2017, 17:45
Short answer is "not directly".

Our damper modeling has been improved (not that there were massive problems in pCARS 1 but every little bit helps), our slow->fast damper transitions are now force based rather than velocity based, many cars have 3rd springs and dampers, the differentials behave and transmit forces way more accurately than before, etc. You can get good results by plonking in the numbers from pC1, but unless you happen to be lucky they won't act the same.

Some help will be provided by the new setup calculator I'm releasing later this week.
Awesome, glad to see a familiar name again. Loved your Calculator in PC1. I did have a question about the transitional settings, not really sure how those work. Also the Rear Diff is so VERY different not sure how to approach that. Hopeing for some informative Youtube videos as its very time consuming to test each and every setting one by one for cause and effect.

Jussi Karjalainen
26-09-2017, 18:14
Awesome, glad to see a familiar name again. Loved your Calculator in PC1. I did have a question about the transitional settings, not really sure how those work. Also the Rear Diff is so VERY different not sure how to approach that. Hopeing for some informative Youtube videos as its very time consuming to test each and every setting one by one for cause and effect.I go over the differentials here:

http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?52783-Magic-inside!-Need-Help-With-Differentials&p=1367069&viewfull=1#post1367069

ozwheels
26-09-2017, 21:26
Short answer is "not directly".

Our damper modeling has been improved (not that there were massive problems in pCARS 1 but every little bit helps), our slow->fast damper transitions are now force based rather than velocity based, many cars have 3rd springs and dampers, the differentials behave and transmit forces way more accurately than before, etc. You can get good results by plonking in the numbers from pC1, but unless you happen to be lucky they won't act the same.

Some help will be provided by the new setup calculator I'm releasing later this week.
Why was the digression knee units switched to Newtons rather than inches per second? I can't say I've ever heard a digression knee described in Newtons. Damping rates yes, but not the digression knee.

Jussi Karjalainen
26-09-2017, 21:41
Why was the digression knee units switched to Newtons rather than inches per second? I can't say I've ever heard a digression knee described in Newtons. Damping rates yes, but not the digression knee.Quite a few of the technical manuals we have use Newtons, and playing around in the Ohlins app it's quite normal to see the transition force staying fairly similar while the knee speed varies a lot.

In the end it's two ways to describe the same thing, and we went with transition force.

ozwheels
26-09-2017, 22:00
Quite a few of the technical manuals we have use Newtons, and playing around in the Ohlins app it's quite normal to see the transition force staying fairly similar while the knee speed varies a lot.

In the end it's two ways to describe the same thing, and we went with transition force.
The default knee for the 488 GT3 slow bump is 1715N. This makes me think to switch from low to high speed there needs to be a force equal to 1715N or greater for the switchover to occur. Am I correct in that assumption for the in game dampers?

Jussi Karjalainen
27-09-2017, 01:42
Yes (when measured at the damper).

If you want, it's easy to calculate the velocity of the digression knee yourself:

(transition force/slow damper setting)*39.37 = transition velocity in inches/second.

For the Ferrari example, if the slow bump setting is 22500 and the transition is 1715:

(1715/22500)*39.37= ~3.00 in/s.

Note though that this isn't the complete truth either, since this doesn't account for the motion ratio of the suspension. The figure here is velocity at the damper, not at the wheel. It can still be a useful value.

The suspension calculator will have displays for transition velocities as well.

ozwheels
27-09-2017, 02:49
Yes (when measured at the damper).

If you want, it's easy to calculate the velocity of the digression knee yourself:

(transition force/slow damper setting)*39.37 = transition velocity in inches/second.

For the Ferrari example, if the slow bump setting is 22500 and the transition is 1715:

(1715/22500)*39.37= ~3.00 in/s.

Note though that this isn't the complete truth either, since this doesn't account for the motion ratio of the suspension. The figure here is velocity at the damper, not at the wheel. It can still be a useful value.

The suspension calculator will have displays for transition velocities as well.
Out of pure curiosity, where did you get that equation for knee velocity? I can't wait to see what you've done with your calculator. :)

Jussi Karjalainen
27-09-2017, 03:03
Well the transition force/slow damper setting is pretty self explanatory, the 39.37 is the conversion factor for meters per second to inches per second (100/2.54= 39.37).

ozwheels
27-09-2017, 03:11
Well the transition force/slow damper setting is pretty self explanatory, the 39.37 is the conversion factor for meters per second to inches per second (100/2.54= 39.37).
Thanks

ozwheels
27-09-2017, 07:09
Yes (when measured at the damper).

If you want, it's easy to calculate the velocity of the digression knee yourself:

(transition force/slow damper setting)*39.37 = transition velocity in inches/second.

For the Ferrari example, if the slow bump setting is 22500 and the transition is 1715:

(1715/22500)*39.37= ~3.00 in/s.

Note though that this isn't the complete truth either, since this doesn't account for the motion ratio of the suspension. The figure here is velocity at the damper, not at the wheel. It can still be a useful value.

The suspension calculator will have displays for transition velocities as well.
Thinking about that equation and using some numbers I'm a bit confused. With that equation if you change the damping it changes the knee speed as well. Changing damping forces doesn't change the knee speed in a damper so what's going on here? This sort of brings me back to the original question of Force being displayed in game and not a Velocity. Where as the actual damping rates in game are displayed as if you're reading a Force vs. Velocity graph, which makes sense.