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TexasTyme214
04-01-2018, 22:15
Zhuhai GP
13:00 and Clear Weather
March 4th
Full Damage
Mechanical Failures On

This may have been brought up before, but I think the engine takes damage too quickly for this sort of car. I ran both the endurance and standard versions of this car at the settings above and 100% radiator got the following result:

Endurance: 7% damage after 7 laps and one sector.
Standard: 6% damage after 8 laps. I think early into the 9th lap there would have been 7% damage.

With no other damage, I went into the pits in the standard car after 8 laps, and the repairs took 13.9 seconds to fix. Just to double check, I took the R35 GT-R GT3 and AMG GT3 for an 8 lap run and a pit stop to see how much engine damage they received. All cars in the test ran at maximum possible power, maximum radiator, and the settings at the top of the post. The results are:

GT-R: 1% engine damage and 1.7s repair time.
AMG: 1% engine damage and 1.9s repair time.

This doesn't matter that much for the typical sprint race, but for a league or endurance setting, the Porsches are taking far too much damage over time. At the end of each fuel stint, I can see the 911 taking well over a minute to fix the engine while several other GT3 cars beating this out of the pits. Choosing to not repair the damage would likely kill the engine in the next fuel stint. Devs please adjust this car's engine model to at least be in the ballpark of other cars unless this is realistic. As a side note, engine damage could be a cool way to adjust BoP in all the classes out there, at least for endurance races.

Sjonnie1989
05-01-2018, 10:27
Spend quite some time trying to make the GT3R fast (which it really is after some work) and noticed this too.

After reviewing my driving style, I noticed this primarily happens due to downshifting too early. If the engine takes some (too) high revs during downshifts, you get engine damage (up to 1% per corner!!!). The 911 GT3R seems very sensitive to this, as the Bentley can be seriously mistreated and gets no damage at all. Pay attention to the shifts and it should be less!

Mad Al
05-01-2018, 10:36
Yep, the problem isn't the car, it's the way you drive it.

Avoid over revving on down shifts and the car should last about the same as all the others (give or take a little) ..

Fight-Test
05-01-2018, 11:55
Yep, the problem isn't the car, it's the way you drive it.

Avoid over revving on down shifts and the car should last about the same as all the others (give or take a little) ..

I think it's more than that. It's just to sensitive even under conservative driving. A hour stint will be almost impossible to keep under 15 to 20 percent damage. We have downshift protection don't we? I'm not saying driving style doesn't contribute but it's just too harsh when you can drive other cars much harder with far less damage.

Zaskarspants
05-01-2018, 12:17
You thnik that car is bad, try the r5 group B.
Iirc irl that car had a 1400cc engine with the nadgers boosted off it, early turbo tech, and the engines were prone to immolation.

Sjonnie1989
05-01-2018, 14:05
I think it's more than that. It's just to sensitive even under conservative driving. A hour stint will be almost impossible to keep under 15 to 20 percent damage. We have downshift protection don't we? I'm not saying driving style doesn't contribute but it's just too harsh when you can drive other cars much harder with far less damage.

To be fair, the downshift protection on the Porsche is rather aggressively set up -> which makes it easier to downshift too soon. Besides that, I would argue that a Flat 6 3L NA engine is less resistant to a real beating compared to the larger engines (4L TT V8 in the Bentley, AMG V8 engines, VAG 5.2L V10's in Huracan and Audi etc.). In other words, be nice to her and you will have a very fast car ready to take on long stints.

Fight-Test
05-01-2018, 20:47
If it's balanced to realty in comparison to the other cars then I'm all for it. Im just not feeling like it can keep up speed wise while having to drive it a way to protect the car. Seems as if that just makes it not very viable over a long race. I shift at Max power point and down shift carefully. What rpm are you not going over on up and down shifts?

TexasTyme214
05-01-2018, 20:53
To be fair, the downshift protection on the Porsche is rather aggressively set up -> which makes it easier to downshift too soon. Besides that, I would argue that a Flat 6 3L NA engine is less resistant to a real beating compared to the larger engines (4L TT V8 in the Bentley, AMG V8 engines, VAG 5.2L V10's in Huracan and Audi etc.). In other words, be nice to her and you will have a very fast car ready to take on long stints.

I agree with this and Fight-Test on this. The way the 911 is set up is that the same driving style is 6 times worse on damage whether that's aggressive or conservative. I'd request for downshift protection to be more intrusive, but part of me believes the sensitivity of the Porsche is still on the high side. Definitely reward players for saving the engine, but you don't even have the option to push in this car on corner entry in a shorter stint unless it was a handful of laps. In other cars, that option is clearly there.

Mad Al
05-01-2018, 21:56
Just change up when the blue leds are on, or when the three orange leds come on at the latest (that's around 9100 rpm). If you check the HUD you'll see the warning has gone red to say change at around that point.. avoid getting all the leds orange and definitely keep off the rev limiter (that's at 9400 rpm) the wear rate difference between 9100 and hitting the limiter is very large, so just keep well away from it.

If you jump in the 911 and sit with it hitting the limiter in N, it will register 1% damage in around 9 seconds... which should tell you all need to know about what to avoid doing.

As for actual wear in an hour, just over 6% (hit 6% at 54.5 minutes). That's about double the Ginetta with the same driving technique (which is basically how I tend to drive)

TexasTyme214
05-01-2018, 22:15
Just change up when the blue leds are on, or when the three orange leds come on at the latest (that's around 9100 rpm). If you check the HUD you'll see the warning has gone red to say change at around that point.. avoid getting all the leds orange and definitely keep off the rev limiter (that's at 9400 rpm) the wear rate difference between 9100 and hitting the limiter is very large, so just keep well away from it.

If you jump in the 911 and sit with it hitting the limiter in N, it will register 1% damage in around 9 seconds... which should tell you all need to know about what to avoid doing.

As for actual wear in an hour, just over 6% (hit 6% at 54.5 minutes). That's about double the Ginetta with the same driving technique (which is basically how I tend to drive)

I think my issue was more around downshifting than up. I remember to shift around 8500-8750. At a lot of higher altitude tracks, power starts to drop off earlier such that I never needed to go very high. I ran another test, paying closer attention to downshifts. Before, I'd shift down the first gear pretty early and the rest would shift down around 5000 rpm or so. At Zhuhai, I would end up using the end of the 1st gear a lot of sector 2 such that if I shifted down to 1st to early, I would bang the limiter for a short period of time. For some reason, that technique of shifting worked best for me in terms of lap time.

For the test I did today, I would wait until 5000 rpm or so to shift down for all gears unlike before. I also never used 1st gear through the whole lap and chose to get on the throttle in second gear earlier due to less torque. I ended up with 1% damage at the end of my 8 lap test and a 1.3 second repair time, fastest repair time I've seen for the test.

I'm the end, it was my aggressive corner entry that ruined the engine, but it appears that even when conservative, you're repairing for twice as long as the Ginetta with the same driving style. That's not a massive gap in time, but 6 or so seconds can be significant even in a longer race.