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Interneti
23-01-2018, 03:31
Hi,

actually I try to find a solution against oversteering direct after braking with GT3 when traction control is off.

I tried the following things:

1. brake balance more forward - NO
It helps more when I am on the brake, but does not help against oversteering direct after braking.

2. softer stabilizer at the back - NO
Helps more at the end of the curve when accelerating against overstearing.

3. reduction of steering ratio - Needs more testing
Maybe a solution to use a higher steering ratio.

4. Changing from hard to soft tyres - YES!!!
After changing to soft tyres, the oversteering was completely gone.


Any other solution found?

Kostman22
23-01-2018, 03:59
I think the problem could be that you are releasing the brakes to suddenly locking up the rear end, you're not giving the tranny time to catch up to where you're at. You need to release the brakes gradually until you feel the tires grip into the turn. I only say this because i've been playing with only ABS low for the majority of my game time and been there... Control your brakes like you do the gas.

kevin kirk
23-01-2018, 04:09
if you mean it happens in the moment BETWEEN releasing the brake and getting back on throttle, it might be the engine braking setting. So play with that setting. Also lower the number of clutches in the rear diff settings. That will make the transition from brake to throttle smoother. Odds are its your engine braking setting tho.

Atak Kat
23-01-2018, 04:15
Check the differential settings. I usually have the COAST set to about 25.

Tires is dependent on the outside/track temp. If it's colder = soft. hotter=hard. I find that the transition zone is somewhere around 20 deg.
In Hot temps, soft can be ok for one, maybe two laps. After that you'll be all over the place if it's hot out.

hkraft300
23-01-2018, 05:49
Drive slow until the hard tires reach correct temp/ pressure. With cold hard tires it's easy to spin the GT3 car.
The other problem is downshifting just before turning in, or releasing the brake suddenly and turning in. You turn too quick coming off the brakes the weight hasn't shifted to the rear yet and you turn while the weight is still on front wheels = oversteer.



Tires is dependent on the outside/track temp. If it's colder = soft. hotter=hard. I find that the transition zone is somewhere around 20 deg.
In Hot temps, soft can be ok for one, maybe two laps. After that you'll be all over the place if it's hot out.

This is critical, just that I wouldn't recommend coast ramp = 25 (too tight for my tastes).

cpcdem
23-01-2018, 12:08
Yeah, please tel us what car you drive and what are your diff settings (coast and preload) and engine braking setting. Also could it be you're getting the oversteer exactly at the time when you are downshifting for the last time? Interesting what you said about soft tires, though...

hkraft300
23-01-2018, 12:31
Interesting what you said about soft tires, though...

Speculation: he's getting a lot of oversteer on his out laps with hard tires, while it's still cold. Instead of warming them, he switches to soft and problem solved.
Until he finds himself in a race >5 laps on a hot track.

Mahjik
23-01-2018, 13:29
You have to understand a bit about vehicle dynamics. When you slam on the brakes, where does the weight transfer go? To the front. This loads the front tires and makes the rear light. If you have too much steering input at this point, the front has more grip than the rear which can lead to oversteer/spin.

Visceral_Syn
23-01-2018, 13:37
If you want to slow transfer of weight from rear to front, under braking, you also could stiffen front slow rebound, to allow the suspension to resist weight transfer to the front.

correction, the front is going into compression under braking....

cpcdem
23-01-2018, 13:56
Speculation: he's getting a lot of oversteer on his out laps with hard tires, while it's still cold. Instead of warming them, he switches to soft and problem solved.
Until he finds himself in a race >5 laps on a hot track.

Good point!

leaky
23-01-2018, 16:39
kevin kirk is 100% correct in stating engine breaking is the issue here. You probably have it set to 1 or 2 (default value). This is too severe for certain car/track combos. I'm guessing you are losing the car in situations where you are breaking from high speeds into slow tight corners. Remember engine breaking increases as you shift down into the lower gears. Weight is transferred too severely the front, making the car more unstable at the rear, resulting in the lift off over-steer you are describing.Mess around with values between 4-7 and see if it fixes the issue.

Alfisti
23-01-2018, 17:35
Yep, that works for me. Until I increased that slider I was all over the place on lift, god help you if you lift then turn sharply, it was impossible.

Alfisti
23-01-2018, 17:38
Speculation: he's getting a lot of oversteer on his out laps with hard tires, while it's still cold. Instead of warming them, he switches to soft and problem solved.
Until he finds himself in a race >5 laps on a hot track.

Doubt it. So far my experience been that it is hard to get heat in the tyres and making the softs last more than five laps is not an issue for the gt3 cars.

I just think he needs to adjust the engine brake slider as per above.

hkraft300
23-01-2018, 19:04
Doubt it. So far my experience been that it is hard to get heat in the tyres and making the softs last more than five laps is not an issue for the gt3 cars.

I just think he needs to adjust the engine brake slider as per above.

My comment:


Speculation: he's getting a lot of oversteer on his out laps with hard tires, while it's still cold. Instead of warming them, he switches to soft and problem solved.

Is a possible explanation of:



4. Changing from hard to soft tyres - YES!!!
After changing to soft tyres, the oversteering was completely gone.

Because in my experience the only time soft tires magically made oversteer disappear is when hard tires hadn't been warmed up.

Soft tires can last more than 5 laps even on a hot track, that's not the problem. They will, on a >25℃ track, overheat and lose grip after a few laps.

In any car the engine brake option can be left on minimum and still be driven fast given you drive accordingly and compensate for it. That means no aggressive trail braking.

Twinz
23-01-2018, 19:06
If you want to slow transfer of weight from rear to front, under braking, you also could stiffen front slow rebound, to allow the suspension to resist weight transfer to the front.

correction, the front is going into compression under braking....

You can tame some lift-throttle/braking oversteer by tightening rebound on the rear shocks. (They will then resist some of the forward weight transfer.)

Interneti
23-01-2018, 19:39
Hi mates!
Many thanks for all your tips! Wow!
I will try all your proposals and let you know as soon as possible!
Generally I tried the GT3 Ferrari, McLaren, Audi and the Porsche with standard setup.
My thought was, that maybe each car is different in that case, but I had this oversteering with all these cars.
Again, many thanks!
I will test everything!!!

leaky
23-01-2018, 20:52
In any car the engine brake option can be left on minimum and still be driven fast given you drive accordingly and compensate for it. That means no aggressive trail braking.

Agreed

hkraft300
24-01-2018, 01:11
... with standard setup.
My thought was, that maybe each car is different in that case, but I had this oversteering with all these cars.
...

Each car is different, but the standard setup is quite tame and if you're oversteering with all of the cars, I'd recommend a review of your corner entry technique.
No offense.
I think you're too aggressive in the brake -> turn transition phase.

Interneti
24-01-2018, 08:07
https://www.dropbox.com/s/1f1lqo6ny851jr5/Ohne%20Titel.wmv?dl=0

Hi,

I have testes your first possible cause, which was the low temperature on hard tyres.
To test this I startet direct with race, where tyres are heated.
I hope you can see my short video where oversteering after braking was much, much better than before.

cbrown119
24-01-2018, 09:25
What a fantastic thread!

I'm learning so much just from reading this.

I have to start playing with the settings more and learning what setting affects what.

It amazes me how much "attention to the details" was put into this game when you look beyond the surface of just racing....just having the capability to adjust minute settings and actually having an effect on how the car handles is a testament to how much work SMS put into this.

I have so much to learn and feel that I'm barely scratching the surface.

hkraft300
24-01-2018, 10:09
I have so much to learn and feel that I'm barely scratching the surface.

Red pill moment.

kludgey
24-01-2018, 13:59
Each car is different, but the standard setup is quite tame and if you're oversteering with all of the cars, I'd recommend a review of your corner entry technique.
No offense.
I think you're too aggressive in the brake -> turn transition phase.

This is crucial. Sometimes we're too quick to assume its the car and not ourselves. We're all guilty of this because its far easier to assume its the car's fault than our own. Sometimes you can tune these quirks out, other times you have to drive around it. The hard part... knowing when to tune it and when to adapt it. And that only comes with practise.

pferreirag60
24-01-2018, 14:02
Also, you have to be gently with the brakes and the accelerator(you can only slam the brakes in high speed high gears, before start to change gears to do a turn) , no jerky movements with the wheel, no gear change in the middle of a turn. The GT3 cars are the most stable cars of the bunch, no need to touch the brake engine.

Interneti
24-01-2018, 16:51
I think that my question is solved now.
With Standard Setup the secret was to have the hard tires in the right temperature window.

Now I try to reduce my 2:02:456!
The potential time is mericless! ;-)