PDA

View Full Version : At what speeds does aerodynamic grip get important in PCars 2?



Max Torque
27-01-2018, 19:39
Hey guys, when setting up cars for different tracks I always look at the corners the track has in order to adjust the aerodynamics properly. However, an unknown size in the setup is, when aerodynamics get important at all. Sure, aerodynamic grip is likely to be important in Pouhon/Spa and it is likely not important in La Source/Spa (at least I hope so).

So at which cornering speeds is it worth to sacrifice speed for drag, especially in GT3, but also in GT1 cars and open-wheeled monoposti?

TexasTyme214
27-01-2018, 19:43
I consider anything 100mph/160kph and faster a fast corner. I count how many corners there are like that vs how many long straights there are to decide. Cars with tons of power I tend to have extra downforce to ensure better traction in slower corners.

Chin
31-01-2018, 14:22
I consider anything 100mph/160kph and faster a fast corner. I count how many corners there are like that vs how many long straights there are to decide. Cars with tons of power I tend to have extra downforce to ensure better traction in slower corners.

I don't think this really answers the question... A 'fast corner' and when aero becomes a significant factor are not necessarily the same. From what I have read, ~50mph is where aero becomes a consideration on race cars. Really, the only way to know what is the best compromise is by testing (just like real teams). Locations of the tightest and fastest corners relative to the longest straights are going to be a bigger factor than the count of high speed/low speed corners, IMO.

David Wright
01-02-2018, 12:19
Its not really possible to answer the question. At 100 mph you have 25% of the downforce you have at 200 mph and at 50 mph you have 6% of the downforce you have at 200 mph. So downforce at low speeds is tiny compared to high speeds. On the other hand we are quite sensitive to small changes in grip. If grip changes by 2 or 3% you will notice it.

bmanic
01-02-2018, 14:11
It completely depends on the car too. Some cars you can feel the usefulness of down force even at low speeds.. say 60km/h. It's subtle at these speeds but can be felt (that is: There is a real difference between max wings and min wings even in slow speed corners).

MaXyM
01-02-2018, 14:30
One thing to remember: air resistance is quadratic function of speed which means it's value grows (exponentially) faster than speed.
Considering PC2 has no shortcuts in physics, answer to OP is: grip from aero exists for any speed. When it does matter depends on a lot of factors which all comes to ratio between mechanical grip and aero one.

blaugranamarti
01-02-2018, 14:50
air resistance is quadratic function of speed which means it's value grows (exponentially) faster than speed.
Which means it's value grows quadratically (or, more generally, polynomially) faster, not exponentially (that would be much, much faster).

Zaskarspants
01-02-2018, 15:06
I think the blue line gives a good indication of increasing aerodynamic effects.
This is for wind turbines but I presume the forces involved are resolved by similar mechanisms.

https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/wind-power-d_1214.html

iggy
02-02-2018, 12:12
You'd have to get much more specific about what car you were wondering about... or at the very least what class of car... It's virtually impossible to give a single MPH number that defines when downforce becomes important for all cars in PC2

Mahjik
02-02-2018, 14:32
So at which cornering speeds is it worth to sacrifice speed for drag, especially in GT3, but also in GT1 cars and open-wheeled monoposti?

Unfortunately, there are too many variables to make a blanket statement in this space. In most cases, you have to actually test to see what works best for the track. Some tracks will surprise you. Another thing to consider is that if you are racing multi-class. Maybe you want all your speed in a straight line to be able to make passes and you can afford to sacrifice aero in that case. You'd be driving defensively in some areas until you hit those long straights but that's the compromise you have to make (and professionals make as well).

Keep in mind though that the best option is always the one you can keep on the track for the entire race. :)