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STaLLiOnO
25-02-2018, 21:01
Does too much Camber hurt a cars performance? Will less camber be better? I'm trying to determine how much camber GT3 Cars can have. Right or wrong, too much camber will burn your tires out. Also, too much camber or less can cause oversteer and understeer? Alignment is a huge tuning part in the car. Help or guidance to a better controllable GT3.

Jussi Karjalainen
25-02-2018, 21:30
Camber will increase your maximum cornering grip but it will hurt your straight line performance (acceleration, braking), and with extreme values can have the tendency to make the car more twitchy on the limit. I usually find myself faster with maximum camber, but more comfortable running less than that (my main range is in the -2.5 to -3.2 area). On some tracks where corners aren't such a big deal it can be beneficial to run less camber, while on other heavily cornered tracks lots of camber can make up a lot of time. Which way suits you best will only become apparent with experimentation, there's nothing wrong with testing 5 laps on maximum and 5 laps on minimum camber to get a feel for how things play out.

Also camber is not a static value, as the suspension of the car moves the camber changes all the time. Some cars like the Acura NSX GT3 gain a lot of camber with travel and as a result don't need as much camber applied in the setup. The Aston GT3 gains a lot less camber, especially at the rear, so you might need more camber for it to work as well.

Also the balance of front and rear camber can make a big difference, the more front camber you have compared to rear camber (and more caster too since caster angle increases dynamic camber when turning the wheel) the more oversteery the car will generally be.

As a rule of thumb adjust camber so that the difference in temperature between the inside and the outside of the tyre is about 5-10 C (so if the outside is 90 C you'd want the inside to be 95-100 C) for a pretty good starting point, then experiment from there.

STaLLiOnO
25-02-2018, 21:47
Camber will increase your maximum cornering grip but it will hurt your straight line performance (acceleration, braking), and with extreme values can have the tendency to make the car more twitchy on the limit. I usually find myself faster with maximum camber, but more comfortable running less than that (my main range is in the -2.5 to -3.2 area). On some tracks where corners aren't such a big deal it can be beneficial to run less camber, while on other heavily cornered tracks lots of camber can make up a lot of time. Which way suits you best will only become apparent with experimentation, there's nothing wrong with testing 5 laps on maximum and 5 laps on minimum camber to get a feel for how things play out.

Also camber is not a static value, as the suspension of the car moves the camber changes all the time. Some cars like the Acura NSX GT3 gain a lot of camber with travel and as a result don't need as much camber applied in the setup. The Aston GT3 gains a lot less camber, especially at the rear, so you might need more camber for it to work as well.

Also the balance of front and rear camber can make a big difference, the more front camber you have compared to rear camber (and more caster too since caster angle increases dynamic camber when turning the wheel) the more oversteery the car will generally be.

As a rule of thumb adjust camber so that the difference in temperature between the inside and the outside of the tyre is about 5-10 C (so if the outside is 90 C you'd want the inside to be 95-100 C) for a pretty good starting point, then experiment from there.

Thank you!!