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View Full Version : Can anyone explain bump/rebound for a newbie?



Lowndes888
02-03-2018, 03:12
Can anyone be kind enough to explain the effects/benefits of bump and rebound for me, and the best way to work it out per track? Need it as basic as possible lol, I'm not exactly Adrian Newey!! TIA!

Pekka Salminen
02-03-2018, 08:38
I can try, although I am not very good with dampers :D

They are related to dampers ability to resist suspension movement. Bump values is the resistance to compression, while rebound is for the opposite movement (what ever the opposite word for compression is in english :D )
TBH I dont think tuning the dampers is very important, only thing where it have helped me is when I want the car to ride curbs better (But I ran mostly GT3 and GTE cars, it could be more useful in other cars). However, setting them too soft will make the car to bounce up and down like a yoyo. The default values are pretty good at least for modern GT cars.

Atak Kat
02-03-2018, 09:18
I don't mess around with the settings too much. But for whatever reason, I have in my head that:
- it is likely better that the bump is softer, therefore allowing the tire/wheel to move upwards more quickly.
- in opposite, I have in my mind that it is better that the rebound is stronger. Allowing the tire/wheel then to return back downwards quickly.

Like I said, that's in my head. Whether or not it's correct, I really have no idea....

I'd like to understand it better as well, but I think my brain is pretty much maxed out just trying to comprehend all the other things in the car setup. Diff settings have put me pretty much to the limit of my comprehension already.

PostBox981
02-03-2018, 10:20
Maybe it will be helpful to watch EP10 (http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?55787-THE-INSIDER-S-GUIDE-Weekly-In-game-Guide-by-Yorkie065&p=1401732&viewfull=1#post1401732) of Yorkieīs Insiderīs Guide...

blinkngone
02-03-2018, 10:52
Have you checked out the Sticky yet? http://forum.projectcarsgame.com/showthread.php?55139-Post-6-Can-someone-explain-dampers
It is my observation that in TT most people leave the Damper page alone with GT3 cars. The exceptions are the Ovals where you have to adjust them. If I am having problems getting the front to turn in quickly enough for corner entry I will start increasing the Slow Bump on the front. If the rear end is coming around too quickly(spinning) I will reduce the rear Slow Bump and lower the bump transition(which speeds up the transition, the way I remember it but check out the sticky). Most people will not touch the transition adjustments, probably because this was not available in PCars 1.

dhfool
02-03-2018, 13:37
On most tracks/cars it isnīt needed to fiddle with dampers. Without proper suspension telemetry it is very time consuming /hit-miss/ to set dampers right. You donīt know how fast is your suspesnion working so you have no clue if you need to adjust slow or high speed or lower or rise shim stack knee /transition/...

hkraft300
02-03-2018, 13:56
Dampers control/resist/dampen spring movement. Bump is for compression (wheel moving up relative to the body), rebound is for extension (wheel moving down relative to the body). Too soft: car bounces and isn't settled - think of modified, lowered cars that keep bouncing along the road after they hit a bump on the road. Too stiff: they resist spring movement too much, makes the car skittish.

They do take some of the load, and act as dynamic springs. In real life you'll blow the damper valves going too stiff. It'll be like riding on wood blocks instead of springs until the damper dies.

So you can run soft springs with stiff-ish dampers, or stiff springs with soft-ish damping. Indy car apparently (I think Jussi or Casey said it on the pcars1 threads) use super stiff damping to basically lock the suspension in place to favour the Aero.

Lowndes888
03-03-2018, 23:54
Thanks as always for the information folks, makes sense and will keep tryna work it all out ��

Jussi Karjalainen
07-03-2018, 12:29
On most tracks/cars it isnīt needed to fiddle with dampers. Without proper suspension telemetry it is very time consuming /hit-miss/ to set dampers right. You donīt know how fast is your suspesnion working so you have no clue if you need to adjust slow or high speed or lower or rise shim stack knee /transition/...To an extent, yes. As long as you have a good baseline that suits your springs decently you probably won't gain too much from damper tuning. If the car's body is being thrown around too quickly when changing directions (every time you turn you see the body snap sharply) it's a clear indication of the slow damping being too soft overall, if you feel you're being thrown around by bumps too much then fast bump damping (or bump transition) might be too high, and if the whole car feels a bit skittish you might be running too stiff in the slow damping overall.

The suspension calculator is a very good tool for getting to a baseline, and can improve drivability in some cases quite significantly.

Dampers control/resist/dampen spring movement.Personally I prefer the term "control", as it also plays into the idea of spring stiffness and damper stiffness needing to be matched to each other. =)

For maximum mechanical grip you don't want to prevent the springs from moving around, but for keeping the car's body under control you also have to prevent them from moving too much.

rich1e I
07-03-2018, 20:19
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=CJ7O6HQBGYU