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View Full Version : What's The Best Way To Get Heat Into The Tyres?



Richie Padalino
13-03-2018, 11:33
What would people say is the best way to get heat into the tyres? My tyres are always too cold, unless it's like over 100 Fahrenheit air temp.
I presumed it would be tyre pressure, but now I seem to be discovering that's more of a getting them to a temp and/or maintaining that temperature.

Is the answer to adjust the camber? I've played around with this minimally.

AbeWoz
13-03-2018, 11:56
what car/tracks?
what tire compound?
what are the track temps?

Richie Padalino
13-03-2018, 13:17
what car/tracks?
what tire compound?
what are the track temps?

Just in general really. As the problems I find happen with slicks and wets, and pretty much all cars, if it's not hot ambient temperature. I'd say open wheelers, so as not to rely on closing brake ducts or anything like that.

Bealdor
13-03-2018, 13:21
Are you using soft slicks?
If yes then my only advice would be to push harder. Maybe add some aero to make them work harder in corners.

rich1e I
13-03-2018, 13:54
Just always keep an eye on track temps before exiting pits. I'm not entirely sure yet but I think after the latest patch the ideal temp operating window for hard tyres has changed. Before, anything over 20-25C hards were the compound of choice, but now (still testing though) I find it hard to get some heat even at 30C, so for now I'd suggest anything below 32C requires soft tyres. Once you have the right compound the only way to heat up tyres is driving, 5 or 10 laps.
Closing brake ducts will affect your tyre pressures, not temps though.

Mahjik
13-03-2018, 14:02
Lower tire pressures and driving aggressively. Warming tires is about working the sidewalls. If you are driving on tracks with long straights (say Monza), there is only so much you can do as the tires are going to cool on the straights. Real drivers deal with the same things.

hkraft300
13-03-2018, 14:11
Just always keep an eye on track temps before exiting pits. I'm not entirely sure yet but I think after the latest patch the ideal temp operating window for hard tyres has changed. Before, anything over 20-25C hards were the compound of choice, but now (still testing though) I find it hard to get some heat even at 30C, so for now I'd suggest anything below 32C requires soft tyres. Once you have the right compound the only way to heat up tyres is driving, 5 or 10 laps.
Closing brake ducts will affect your tyre pressures, not temps though.

GT and heavy race cars maybe.
I can use soft tires on a 50c imola in an LMP.

I say run soft tires. If they get >90c tire temp, try the hard tires.

Mon Pavion
13-03-2018, 14:52
Just always keep an eye on track temps before exiting pits. I'm not entirely sure yet but I think after the latest patch the ideal temp operating window for hard tyres has changed. Before, anything over 20-25C hards were the compound of choice, but now (still testing though) I find it hard to get some heat even at 30C, so for now I'd suggest anything below 32C requires soft tyres. Once you have the right compound the only way to heat up tyres is driving, 5 or 10 laps.
Closing brake ducts will affect your tyre pressures, not temps though.

I don't know about this. Maybe its my setup, but I was working on a setup at Indy road course in Prototype C the other night with track temps over 100 F (37 C) and Hard Tires were still pretty much undrivable. EXTREMELY loose. On soft the car was generally quick, but obviously tire wear was an issue. Tire temps were all in the green. About 170 F (80C) or so.

AbeWoz
13-03-2018, 15:03
I don't know about this. Maybe its my setup, but I was working on a setup at Indy road course in Prototype C the other night with track temps over 100 F (37 C) and Hard Tires were still pretty much undrivable. EXTREMELY loose. On soft the car was generally quick, but obviously tire wear was an issue. Tire temps were all in the green. About 170 F (80C) or so.

its still track dependent, car dependent, driver style dependent, race length dependent.

just a *general* rule of thumb. if you think you can run soft tires, by all means do it.

Mon Pavion
13-03-2018, 15:17
its still track dependent, car dependent, driver style dependent, race length dependent.

just a *general* rule of thumb. if you think you can run soft tires, by all means do it.

I assumed that prototype C is a much lighter car than say GT cars or road cars? Maybe that was a big factor in why hard tires were not working even on high track temps.

AbeWoz
13-03-2018, 17:50
entirely possible and makes sense.

Atak Kat
13-03-2018, 18:28
I think the window and tolerance of softs is quite a bit higher than it was before. Recently I've been running softs a lot more than before, and they seem to be the better choice in a lot more situations than I thought. Most of my races are 10 laps or less, so that's likely an important factor. I have been in a few races lately even with higher track temps (high 30s, low 40s), but the outside temp a bit lower (like low 20s). And I don't know if it's a factor or not, but when that outside temp is lower, I suspect it somehow has an impact.

I used to choose Hards, almost always. It was usually pretty clear when I needed to choose softs (much lower temps). But now it seems the opposite. I now tend to choose Softs first, and monitor the tire temps over a few laps. If they stay around 90C (maybe even slightly more) I keep the softs. But I do notice that after about 8-10 laps they start to fade. And you need to be a bit cautious not to cook them too early in the race, otherwise they lose grip pretty fast.

awaite85
15-03-2018, 16:02
After the last patch, I just have trouble coming out of corners. I will put the rear anti roll bar all the way down and I still spin accelerating out of corners.

Bealdor
15-03-2018, 16:16
After the last patch, I just have trouble coming out of corners. I will put the rear anti roll bar all the way down and I still spin accelerating out of corners.

Which cars?

Raise the power ramp angle to reduce acc diff lock.

awaite85
15-03-2018, 16:23
The Ford GT in the GTE Class and both Mustang's in the GT4 class. They were fine before the last patch.

Zeratall
18-03-2018, 19:52
Maybe try shifting your wheel rate to the front some. I tend to find the default loose setups have to much rear bias in the natural frequency of the springs, typically I like 10% rear, and I know on some of the cars the loose is like 20% +

Hugo Catarino
15-04-2018, 16:38
I dont have issues with tyre temp on the rain.They work just fine for me with almost every car.Except...
How about track tyres of the Lotus 49?its impossible to race that car on the wet!

Historic career mode event at Monza is unbeatable.its impossible to win since the AI has all the grip in the world while we,after two laps,loose all surface contact due to blue tyres.they get cold so easily,not matter what setup or driving style i use.Spa Historic is even worse.And dont get me started with classic Silverstone!Huge puddle after the last chicane,but the AI cars just go there without problems and we cant do it.
And im off topic...but its impossible to talk about tyre temp in the rain without mentioning the issue that is AI grip in the rain compared to the (lack) of grip we have due to the tyres.
Ir seems to affect the Lotus 49 more than other cars that use track tyres.The Lotus 25,Ferrari 330,GT40,they all work well in the rain.But the 49 suffers a lot.
Again,the racing difficulties are not so much related to tyre temp but more to the insane grip the AI cars have.It just takes a little effort to tame the 49 on rain conditions,but you will always be well behind the AI no matter what you do.They seem to race in the dry,judging the by way they take turns and never leave the racing line no matter how huge and depth the puddles are