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MikaHak
21-08-2018, 18:46
I changed from controller to wheel and before I thought it will be much easier. But it is so much harder to use.. When driving in a straight line the wheel is really working against me and when I am taking on a corner I am losing control very fast. This wasn't really the problem while using the controller.

FFB settings:

RAW

100
75
50
50

Deadzones set on 0 and sens on 50.

Mahjik
21-08-2018, 18:50
What wheel are you using?

true_gamer
21-08-2018, 19:06
I have a Fanatec Clubsport V2.5

I run RAW
Gain 100
Vol 50 (Depending on car, will be more)
Tone 50
FX 50 (Again only increase this on weaker feeling cars up to)

I find you need to run a smaller rotation to get the best from the game and to be able to catch a slide. So running it at 900* is not realistic in a racing game. I found 450* to be the sweet spot for GT3 cars etc, and 360* for open wheeler's. So have a go with that.

Mad Al
21-08-2018, 19:10
I have a Fanatec Clubsport V2.5

I run RAW
Gain 100
Vol 50 (Depending on car, will be more)
Tone 50
FX 50 (Again only increase this on weaker feeling cars up to)

I find you need to run a smaller rotation to get the best from the game and to be able to catch a slide. So running it at 900* is not realistic in a racing game. I found 450* to be the sweet spot for GT3 cars etc, and 360* for open wheeler's. So have a go with that.

Why do people do that.. the game will adjust the DOR to the correct amount per car. You want it tighter, adjust the steering ratio....

true_gamer
21-08-2018, 19:16
Easier to adjust on the fly on the fanatec wheel. Plus I do change the steering ratios in the tuning menu. But also as I race in other games, 450* is the sweet spot.

Shogun613
21-08-2018, 19:16
Why do people do that.. the game will adjust the DOR to the correct amount per car. You want it tighter, adjust the steering ratio....
^This.
Getting used to a wheel is all about establishing new muscle memory, nothing more. You're going from using just your thumbs to using your arms, upper body and legs. Just keep driving and you'll become more and more comfortable and competent.
Also, prepare to sweat a lot from the increased activity.

MikaHak
21-08-2018, 19:19
What wheel are you using?

Logitech G29!

xtro
21-08-2018, 19:42
Logitech G29!

I agree on setting the DOR on the hardware side... I have had much better experience lately with doing this rather than letting the soft lock doing it in game. For example hypercars with SC are swaying all over the place in a straight line at 900 .. Same with the abs unbalancing the car. The problem is completely gone at lower DOR. Same for karting and Formula cars... Awesome to drive at 360. Same for the m3 GT4 and clio and those other tricky cars. It might be less of an issue with higher end wheels though.

MikaHak
21-08-2018, 20:14
Where can I change the DOR of the Logitech g29? Do I need to set it to 450?

true_gamer
21-08-2018, 20:20
It will be in your Logitech control panel. Also turn off Dampener and spring, so you get raw feedback. :)

Mad Al
21-08-2018, 20:20
make sure it's on the full 900 and just leave the game to sort it out.. stop using raw, it's not really meant for lower end wheels...


Do you actually drive a car ?

Mahjik
21-08-2018, 20:30
make sure it's on the full 900 and just leave the game to sort it out.. stop using raw, it's not really meant for lower end wheels...

This.

PC2 will set the steering angle based on the car's steering geometry. If you configure your wheel for 900 degrees, and the car uses 450 degrees; you will have 450 degrees of steering at a 1:1 ratio (linear). If you configure your wheel for say 450 degrees and the car you pick uses 900 degrees, you will have 450 degrees of steering but the ratio will not be linear to squeeze 900 degrees of rotation into 450 degrees.

As for the FFB flavor, RAW is really meant for Direct Drive wheels. You should really use Informative for Immersive for non-DD wheels. However, it's all subjective so play with them all and see which one you like.

MikaHak
21-08-2018, 20:35
make sure it's on the full 900 and just leave the game to sort it out.. stop using raw, it's not really meant for lower end wheels...


Do you actually drive a car ?


I am on PS4 so I dont have the control panel to set it to 450. I can calibrate it in the main menu though.

Which FFB setting do I need to use according to you?



Edit: thanks guys! Will try different FFB settings and try to adjust steering ratio.

Redna1L
21-08-2018, 21:49
Take it slow it will take some time to get used to. But eventually it will start to gel. Then you will be able to explore every last inch of the track with good steering and throttle control.

As to wheel sensitivity I find that PC doesn’t give you enough. Going from automatic to 680 on my wheel resulted in me going nearly 2 seconds a lap faster around Imola.

true_gamer
21-08-2018, 22:09
I guess the settings are each to their own. I found what works for me. :)

I have a friend who is well known for fast times on PCars2 that runs with 180 DOR, Which is crazy, yet he can set some fast TT times.

Juiced46
21-08-2018, 22:35
Where can I change the DOR of the Logitech g29? Do I need to set it to 450?

Do NOT set DOR to 450! This is very bad advice.

Also like others have mentioned, make sure DOR on the wheel is set to 900.

Also once you verify you have it on 900 make sure you calibrate your wheel CORRECTLY in game.

First part of calibration, you will rotate it in either direction until it reads 100. Center the wheel again. Now it wants you to go to 90 DEGREES. Turn the wheel right to the "3 oclock position" When you reach 90 degrees the screen will read "900"

Lastly, make sure you have OPPOSITE LOCK in the gameplay menu turned OFF. This can cause instability with your wheel.

Here is a link how to set DOR with the Logitech software along with sensitivity if you need it. You need to install the software on a PC so you can adjust, even though you have a PS4.

https://support.logitech.com/en_us/article/Adjust-sensitivity-on-the-G29-and-G920-racing-wheels-with-Logitech-Gaming-Software?product=a0qi0000006PmxKAAS

true_gamer
21-08-2018, 23:20
I can't see how setting your DOR on a hardware level is bad advice? If you set it to a said DOR and calibrate it in the game to that DOR, then what's the problem?

The in car steering wheel will rotate to match your wheel, so if you calibrate it in game, then there's no problems...

Also using Raw ffb input works great on high end belt driven wheels, especially the Fanatec Clubsport, as it is as close to a DD wheel as you can get.

Before that, I did own a G25 for 10yrs. But when PCars 2 came out, I was getting too much clipping and losing so much detail, that turning down the force feedback to get all the finer detail made the wheel feel soo light.

true_gamer
21-08-2018, 23:23
Also better add that I am using the Fanatec McLaren GT3 rim, so 900 DOR is a no go with that rim, hence the 450 DOR which is perfect in such cars. :)

Mahjik
21-08-2018, 23:56
I can't see how setting your DOR on a hardware level is bad advice? If you set it to a said DOR and calibrate it in the game to that DOR, then what's the problem?

Depends on the cars you drive in-game. I mention the issue above:



PC2 will set the steering angle based on the car's steering geometry. If you configure your wheel for 900 degrees, and the car uses 450 degrees; you will have 450 degrees of steering at a 1:1 ratio (linear). If you configure your wheel for say 450 degrees and the car you pick uses 900 degrees, you will have 450 degrees of steering but the ratio will not be linear to squeeze 900 degrees of rotation into 450 degrees.


This would mainly affect vintage and road cars. If you never drive any of those categories, then you may not encounter a less than desirable playing experience.

poirqc
22-08-2018, 01:56
You could try my signature settings. They feel natural to me.

hkraft300
22-08-2018, 02:50
This would mainly affect vintage and road cars. If you never drive any of those categories, then you may not encounter a less than desirable playing experience.

I suspect it screws with / compresses the ffb in all cars.

+1 for full DOR then adjust steering ratio in car setup.

Also try throttle & steering sensitivity 50, brake sensitivity 30.

Then if you find too much brake lock use abs and/or reduce brake pressure. I'm anywhere between 80-100%.

It take practice to learn to brake+ throttle with your feet and steer with your hands.
Like learning drums.
To be fast it's a combination of:
- the coordination of your limbs,
- accuracy of inputs,
- sensitivity to ffb,
- good track driving technique.

It all has to come together. Perfect practice makes perfect.
For perfect practice you need your hardware setup correctly.

Edit: I use raw for my g29 but I also have volume and tone adjusted accordingly.

Pekka Salminen
22-08-2018, 06:45
One very important thing to keep in mind is the seating position. Unnatural position makes driving much harder than it actually would be with good position. Also, the pedals should be mounted in a way that you can trust them not to slip. Same applies to chair, if you use office chair with wheels. I have put my pedals against a wall with a supporting box between wall and pedals, and a fluffy rug under my office chair, so it doesn't move when driving.

Hope all these tips are helpful :encouragement:

Olijke Poffer
22-08-2018, 07:43
This.

PC2 will set the steering angle based on the car's steering geometry. If you configure your wheel for 900 degrees, and the car uses 450 degrees; you will have 450 degrees of steering at a 1:1 ratio (linear). If you configure your wheel for say 450 degrees and the car you pick uses 900 degrees, you will have 450 degrees of steering but the ratio will not be linear to squeeze 900 degrees of rotation into 450 degrees.

As for the FFB flavor, RAW is really meant for Direct Drive wheels. You should really use Informative for Immersive for non-DD wheels. However, it's all subjective so play with them all and see which one you like.

So even with my csw v2,5 I better not use Raw?

justonce68
22-08-2018, 07:50
Just practice and get used to the wheel, when i switched a few years back i felt like i would never get used to it, it took a couple of weeks to get back up to speed.

hkraft300
22-08-2018, 08:21
One very important thing to keep in mind is the seating position. Unnatural position makes driving much harder than it actually would be with good position. Also, the pedals should be mounted in a way that you can trust them not to slip. Same applies to chair, if you use office chair with wheels. I have put my pedals against a wall with a supporting box between wall and pedals, and a fluffy rug under my office chair, so it doesn't move when driving.

Hope all these tips are helpful :encouragement:

This is big.
I built my rig out of steel so my pedals and seat are bolted down tight. My lap times dropped and got more consistent because I now have far better pedal control and accuracy.

MaximusN
22-08-2018, 08:27
So even with my csw v2,5 I better not use Raw?
Raw is just fine for a CSW 2.5 IMHO.

true_gamer
22-08-2018, 08:27
Depends on the cars you drive in-game. I mention the issue above:

This would mainly affect vintage and road cars. If you never drive any of those categories, then you may not encounter a less than desirable playing experience.


That's why I did put in my first post this;


I found 450* to be the sweet spot for GT3 cars etc, and 360* for open wheeler's. So have a go with that.

But I think it must of been misread/missed. :)


Also, I'm sure many users don't understand the FFB settings in the game, as I see some people running with very low Tone and FX.

To make it clearer, imagine the slider looks like this;

FFB Tone;

0_____________________50___________________100
<-Feel more track detail - Feel more tyre detail->

So the question is do you want to have more of a hand massage whilst driving using using 0-->50 or do you want to feel exactly what the tyres are doing 50-->100.
Tone FFB is about finding the sweet spot, I find having a balance of 50 gives the best overall experience.

FFB FX 50 is default;

0_____________________50___________________100
<-Less feel to the road - More feel to the road->


(To keep the graph in place, when I say road, it means road surface/Kerbs and Bumps)

So in other words, turning this setting up can cause FFB clipping when going over a kerb etc on high down force corners, so leaving this at 50 shouldn't give you any clipping, but that will also depend on your FFB Volume, as having to much Volume will effect these settings, giving you clipping.

Personally, I run my wheel control panel settings at 90% FFB gain, leaving the in game Gain to 100%.

Due to some cars and tracks not having as strong FFB feel, I increase my Volume and FX on those weaker feeling cars and tracks, but don't just set them to 100 as that will give you no detail and lots of clipping. So realistically, in those said cars and tracks, I genuinely never go above 75%. - Though this is different on all wheels.

hkraft300
22-08-2018, 09:28
Tone is not a track detail vs tire detail adjustment.

Atak Kat
22-08-2018, 09:47
My interpretation of tone is that:
Low tone will prioritize on giving you that lightness in the steering when your front wheels or losing grip. Understeer basically.
High tone will prioritize on giving you a heavier feeling in the steering when there is cornering pressure. Like whe you are in a high speed corner and the wheel weight gets heavier.

The two are kinda opposite and possibly can offset each other. So thus the slider to choose your preference.

I think. Ready to learn something though.

MaximusN
22-08-2018, 10:07
My interpretation of tone is that:
Low tone will prioritize on giving you that lightness in the steering when your front wheels or losing grip. Understeer basically.
High tone will prioritize on giving you a heavier feeling in the steering when there is cornering pressure. Like whe you are in a high speed corner and the wheel weight gets heavier.

The two are kinda opposite and possibly can offset each other. So thus the slider to choose your preference.

I think. Ready to learn something though.

That's how I feel it too, so it's at the very low end of tone for me.

Scott Coffey
22-08-2018, 12:28
This.

PC2 will set the steering angle based on the car's steering geometry. If you configure your wheel for 900 degrees, and the car uses 450 degrees; you will have 450 degrees of steering at a 1:1 ratio (linear). If you configure your wheel for say 450 degrees and the car you pick uses 900 degrees, you will have 450 degrees of steering but the ratio will not be linear to squeeze 900 degrees of rotation into 450 degrees.

As for the FFB flavor, RAW is really meant for Direct Drive wheels. You should really use Informative for Immersive for non-DD wheels. However, it's all subjective so play with them all and see which one you like.

I use a G27 and RAW is best for me. The canned versions introduce too many unwanted effects on the wheel.

hmmsk
22-08-2018, 13:56
Just drive a lot with the wheel

Mahjik
22-08-2018, 13:58
But I think it must of been misread/missed. :)

It wasn't misread. You asked a question on why it's bad, so I explained. At some point, others will read this thread and they may drive more than just modern open wheelers and GT3's. Providing the proper information on how the system works was the goal. Manually changing the DOR can have other consequences so users need to be aware to see if they will run into those consequences based on how they play the sim.


I use a G27 and RAW is best for me. The canned versions introduce too many unwanted effects on the wheel.

Didn't say you couldn't use it, but that it was introduced for DD wheels. The other modes are designed for non-DD wheels. However, the modes are available for all wheels so use what you enjoy.

true_gamer
22-08-2018, 14:06
Tone is not a track detail vs tire detail adjustment.

I think you will find it is just that. Track detail/surface detail...

Quoted from here https://www.projectcarsgame.com/the_insiders_guide/episode-4-setting-feel-force-feedback/

—Tone: Tone is the feeling of surface detail at one end of the scale, and tyre slip at the other. The setting is an open sweep from the Aligning Torque (Mz) force at “0” (where surface detail is more pronounced, but there is less feel when it comes to tyre slip), to Side Load (Fy) force at “1” (where there is a stronger feel with respect to tyre slip, but less surface detail). Find the balance that suits your own personal preference.

—FX: FX affects the strength of surface detail. Using a higher FX setting will make the effects of surface detail—road bumps and kerbs, for instance—stronger and more pronounced, but this can also lead to clipping with larger and bigger Force Feedback spikes when the FFB is under load through cornering. By lowering the setting, or making them weaker, you can prevent clipping, and also create a smoother feeling to the Force Feedback when riding over bumps and kerbs.

Find the balance that suits your own personal preference whilst trying to avoid Force Feedback clipping during heavy cornering and kerb usage.

Schnizz58
22-08-2018, 14:35
Also once you verify you have it on 900 make sure you calibrate your wheel CORRECTLY in game.

First part of calibration, you will rotate it in either direction until it reads 100. Center the wheel again. Now it wants you to go to 90 DEGREES. Turn the wheel right to the "3 oclock position" When you reach 90 degrees the screen will read "900"[/url]
Actually this isn't quite right. You turn the wheel 90 degrees regardless of what the readout says. The point of calibration is to tell the game when the wheel says it's rotated this much, it's really 90°. Then other amounts of rotation will scale accordingly. If the game already knows that 900 = 90° then there wouldn't be any need to calibrate it.



PC2 will set the steering angle based on the car's steering geometry. If you configure your wheel for 900 degrees, and the car uses 450 degrees; you will have 450 degrees of steering at a 1:1 ratio (linear). If you configure your wheel for say 450 degrees and the car you pick uses 900 degrees, you will have 450 degrees of steering but the ratio will not be linear to squeeze 900 degrees of rotation into 450 degrees.
This is a little bit pedantic but...

If you set your wheel to 450 degrees and the car uses 900 degrees, the ratio will still be linear. It just won't be 1:1 (it'll be 2:1 instead).

hkraft300
22-08-2018, 21:06
I think you will find it is just that. Track detail/surface detail...

Quoted from here https://www.projectcarsgame.com/the_insiders_guide/episode-4-setting-feel-force-feedback/

—Tone: Tone is the feeling of surface detail at one end of the scale, and tyre slip at the other. The setting is an open sweep from the Aligning Torque (Mz) force at “0” (where surface detail is more pronounced, but there is less feel when it comes to tyre slip), to Side Load (Fy) force at “1” (where there is a stronger feel with respect to tyre slip, but less surface detail). .

Agreed that's the given explanation, and it is an Mz - Fy scale. But I don't agree Mz just gives "feeling of surface detail" and not "tire slip feel".
Mz from my understanding is a torque moment at the tire surface. Even if the track surface is smooth but provides friction with the tire, in a situation where the tire slips at an angle to the direction of travel, a torque is generated such that the tire wants to align with the direction of travel.
In which case, in an understeer situation as atak Kat mentioned above, understeer ffb signal is derived from this Mz.
At low tone, if you're not clipping, in the G29 the understeer feel is very pronounced. If it were the case that low tone muted tire slip feel, the understeer would be hard to read.
Each to their own, but I'm a proponent of low tone. Try it with a low grip tire, slide around and see how it feels :)

VRTOM
22-08-2018, 21:33
I just got my wheel a few weeks ago and was also struggling using a wheel for the first time.

Here are my 2 cents:

- make sure your wheel is not far away from you or too close (when i stretch my arms over the wheel my wrist passes the wheel about 8 cm (give or take)
- turn the FX down in the beginning; it will give you so much information that you will be fighting the wheel more than actually using it (like others said)
- don't begin with too strong volume, just start easy and then work your way up that suits your style
- practice with a track and a car you know well; you will have a good reference then when using/testing the wheel

It will click eventually, trust me. :D

Mahjik
22-08-2018, 21:37
This is a little bit pedantic but...

If you set your wheel to 450 degrees and the car uses 900 degrees, the ratio will still be linear. It just won't be 1:1 (it'll be 2:1 instead).

Not necessarily. IIRC, it's not exactly linear how it scales (similar to how the speed sensitivity works). Granted, I don't have access to the code to verify but I do recall discussions during PC1 about this topic (mainly around older wheels like the Logitech Momo and Formula Force which have very small ranges).

g.stew
22-08-2018, 21:39
I had problems with the soft lock before when setting my wheel to the full DOR and calibrating in game, but it was really related to the ffb. I would set the ffb so it wasn't clipping, but the soft lock itself is additional ffb signal on top of your normal ffb. If I was at a point where my ffb signal was close to 100%, and then I hit the soft lock, the soft lock could actually be clipped. It would go past the soft lock which is worse on a corner where the ffb is already strong and then your wheel almost feels like it's skipping. Once I realized this, I just had to make sure there was enough headroom for the soft lock feedback. I really like the pcars2 soft lock now and find no reason to change my hardware DOR in this game.



To the OP, one of the biggest differences is that on the controller, you had feedback directly on your braking and throttle inputs. If you pulled the brake trigger too hard, you could feel it start to lock up from the rumble in the trigger. Now with a wheel and pedals, you don't have that feedback directly on your braking inputs, but you do have it on your wheel. You just need to get used to the new way you are getting feedback so you can start to trust it and react to it. This won't take long, but you do have much more distinct feedback now so you have to understand what you are feeling.

Try driving some slower laps and gradually work up each time you start playing. Even if you were going faster at the end of one session, start off slow again on the next and build up again for a little while until you get used to it.

If you have the porsche dlc, you can also use one of the Leipzig tracks that has a skidpad on it. Use the skidpad to push the car to oversteer, understeer, lock your brakes, etc. so you can get used to the different types of feedback information you will get for them.

Enjoy your wheel!

Schnizz58
22-08-2018, 21:50
Not necessarily. IIRC, it's not exactly linear how it scales (similar to how the speed sensitivity works). Granted, I don't have access to the code to verify but I do recall discussions during PC1 about this topic (mainly around older wheels like the Logitech Momo and Formula Force which have very small ranges).

Yeah I thought about that possibility when I was replying but I figured if that was the case, then it probably isn't linear even at 1:1.

BrakeCheck101
22-08-2018, 22:24
My best advice for anyone struggling with the wheel, or have just picked it up - do small 30 minute practice sessions each day.

If you do much more than 30 minutes each day, you'll end up frustrated, as after a while you'll just keep spinning because you're pushing too hard.

Apart from that, just drive slowly. Do some time trial and take it easy.

As real as it can sometimes feel, our wheels are quite different to what we're used to in real life. It takes time and patience.

Juiced46
22-08-2018, 22:40
Actually this isn't quite right. You turn the wheel 90 degrees regardless of what the readout says. The point of calibration is to tell the game when the wheel says it's rotated this much, it's really 90°. Then other amounts of rotation will scale accordingly. If the game already knows that 900 = 90° then there wouldn't be any need to calibrate it.


People get confused when it says turn it to 90 degrees, they think they should see 90 on the screen. So for example, as I stated. If DOR on the wheel is set to 900. When you turn the wheel to true 90 degrees, it will show 900 on the screen. That is all I am saying. As others are slightly confused about this part from reading other threads.

Schnizz58
22-08-2018, 22:48
People get confused when it says turn it to 90 degrees, they think they should see 90 on the screen. So for example, as I stated. If DOR on the wheel is set to 900. When you turn the wheel to true 90 degrees, it will show 900 on the screen. That is all I am saying. As others are slightly confused about this part from reading other threads.
I think you misunderstood what I was saying. If the game displays 900 when you turn the wheel 90°, then there's no point to calibrating it. It would actually be better if there was no readout because people think you're supposed to turn the wheel until it reads 900.

Mahjik
22-08-2018, 23:04
Yeah I thought about that possibility when I was replying but I figured if that was the case, then it probably isn't linear even at 1:1.

It is linear at the middle sensitivity if it doesn't need to scale.... (that's a mouthful)

Juiced46
22-08-2018, 23:45
I think you misunderstood what I was saying. If the game displays 900 when you turn the wheel 90°, then there's no point to calibrating it. It would actually be better if there was no readout because people think you're supposed to turn the wheel until it reads 900.

That is how the ingame calibration works though. 90 degrees= the DOR you have set to the wheel. When you calibrate your wheel in game. What does the value read when you turn it to 90 degrees? It should match your DOR....

Here are 2 pictures for example. You can see in the first picture the wheel is set to 900 DOR, when the wheel is at true 90 degrees, it shows 900 on screen. I then set the wheel to 450 DOR, at true 90 degrees, the value reads 450......

I have no idea why the picture rotated on me.....

259245

259246

Schnizz58
22-08-2018, 23:57
That's a common misconception. The readout tells you what the wheel is sending to the game. If it happens to be 900 at 90°, then your wheel is accurate. [900 actually means 90.0°.] However, if the wheel is a little bit off, the game needs to know what the wheel thinks is 90°. So let's say you turn the wheel 90° but the readout says 910. Now you have to calibrate it, otherwise the game will think the wheel is rotated 91°. Then after it's calibrated, the game will be able to figure out how many degrees it's rotated for any other amount of rotation. If the wheel sends 455, the game knows that the wheel is rotated 45°.

If the game already knows that a value of 900 = 90° of rotation, what's the point of calibrating it? Having that readout confuses people into thinking that they're supposed to turn the wheel until it reads 900 instead of turning the wheel 90° like they're supposed to.

hkraft300
23-08-2018, 00:07
I'm with schnizz on the calibration.
Get the spirit level out and put your wheel at 90° for the second step and ignore what it says on the screen.
Mine reads about 896-8 at true 90°.

Keena
23-08-2018, 17:37
My advice- choose a car and circuit that is forgiving, predictable and fun. If its a ffb wheel, experiment with tone. Sone cars I like it right down, others the opposite. Tone can have a big impact on how it feels and also how the car behaves. Then learn what effect caster has in the car settings. Lots of caster is like a chopper bike with long forks, low caster is like a race bike- very nimble and light. Finally and not least, steering rack- you may find a short rack better as you get more effect and dont have to steer so much, but this does require all the above to be feeding info to you first. Good luck and yes, at first it feels very very odd. But that doesnt last... i pkayed dirt rallyfor 18 mins when i first got it. Now after all ive learnt with pc2 i went back, looked incredulously at my stupid ffb settings, fixed them and had a blast and a half..

Juiced46
23-08-2018, 22:29
That's a common misconception. The readout tells you what the wheel is sending to the game. If it happens to be 900 at 90°, then your wheel is accurate. [900 actually means 90.0°.] However, if the wheel is a little bit off, the game needs to know what the wheel thinks is 90°. So let's say you turn the wheel 90° but the readout says 910. Now you have to calibrate it, otherwise the game will think the wheel is rotated 91°. Then after it's calibrated, the game will be able to figure out how many degrees it's rotated for any other amount of rotation. If the wheel sends 455, the game knows that the wheel is rotated 45°.

If the game already knows that a value of 900 = 90° of rotation, what's the point of calibrating it? Having that readout confuses people into thinking that they're supposed to turn the wheel until it reads 900 instead of turning the wheel 90° like they're supposed to.


I'm with schnizz on the calibration.
Get the spirit level out and put your wheel at 90° for the second step and ignore what it says on the screen.
Mine reads about 896-8 at true 90°.

I get what you are saying. Maybe I should have re worded my original comment to when you go 90 degrees it should be "around" what DOR is set to. My point is if you are calibrating your wheel and its set to 900 DOR, when you go to 90 degrees, you are not looking for it to say 90 degrees and that it shouldnt read anything like 400-500 or something is really wrong. I have read countless threads where people are not calibrating their wheels correctly at all and they also have issues in game on how the steering acts. I also agree, there should be no # shown on that screen at all.

Itzcoatl
24-08-2018, 14:03
Have you guys any advice for switching from a wheel with two pedals and shifter paddles to a wheel with a clutch and h-pattern?

I experienced a similar learning curve to the OP when I first picked up my wheel, but as others have stated after a bit of practise you build up the muscle memory and it becomes much easier and more natural.

Now, with the addition of clutch and h-shifter (Logitech G920), I can't keep any sort of pace at all. I have no idea where to put my feet when braking and downshifting, essentially. I don't drive IRL (can't afford it quite yet) so perhaps this is also an obstacle. Are there any good videos to help a noob better his footwork?

hkraft300
24-08-2018, 14:38
Brake/throttle right foot. Clutch left foot.
YouTube some heel-toe downshift and h-shift videos.
Start slow, build your speed.

Keena
24-08-2018, 21:01
Have you guys any advice for switching from a wheel with two pedals and shifter paddles to a wheel with a clutch and h-pattern?

I experienced a similar learning curve to the OP when I first picked up my wheel, but as others have stated after a bit of practise you build up the muscle memory and it becomes much easier and more natural.

Now, with the addition of clutch and h-shifter (Logitech G920), I can't keep any sort of pace at all. I have no idea where to put my feet when braking and downshifting, essentially. I don't drive IRL (can't afford it quite yet) so perhaps this is also an obstacle. Are there any good videos to help a noob better his footwork?

You may need to adjust brake pedal sensitivity so that you dont have to depress it too far in relation to the throttle which youll need to blip during your downshifts. I started off like you well down on pace. Stick with it. It will come, and it is faster. Youll find yourself noticeably faster than before you changed before too long.
https://youtu.be/CwqVTikzOp4

Vic Flange
25-08-2018, 08:06
Have you guys any advice for switching from a wheel with two pedals and shifter paddles to a wheel with a clutch and h-pattern?

I experienced a similar learning curve to the OP when I first picked up my wheel, but as others have stated after a bit of practise you build up the muscle memory and it becomes much easier and more natural.

Now, with the addition of clutch and h-shifter (Logitech G920), I can't keep any sort of pace at all. I have no idea where to put my feet when braking and downshifting, essentially. I don't drive IRL (can't afford it quite yet) so perhaps this is also an obstacle. Are there any good videos to help a noob better his footwork?

Start by learning to shift with the H-Pattern and using automatic clutch. Then when you can find all the gear positions without thinking about it try an easy track with manual clutch.
Right foot switching between accelerator and brake, left foot on the clutch. There are times when you need to bend this rule slightly (left foot braking when you don’t need to change gear for example).