PDA

View Full Version : VR changed my driving on a simulator with p cars 2



MAXF1
27-08-2018, 17:31
I built my Xbox 1 simulator about 5 years ago,madkatz wheel and pedals,which I actually built a f1 car in my loft,
I have always found the cockpit view too obstructing for me with all the blind spots,so always had the low bonnet view,,
I went to a games exhibition in Southampton over this bankholiday,which they had a full race sim with VR ,
It was set on a cockpit view of the Aston Martin gt3: completely blew me away ,
I think I didnít show myself up ,but took me a few laps to get used to the strange surrounds of the cockpit view,,so in 5 years Ime hooked on this new view,sadly I have no VR,but I suffered from motion sickness and had to pack it in after 30 mins,

Javaniceday
27-08-2018, 17:56
The VR sickness goes away after a while. Your brain learns that it will not experience the g-forces associated with what your eyes see when you're in the driving sim.

The trick is to drive in 5 to 10 minute intervals, little by little building up the tolerance. Don't push it - if you start to feel clammy, sweaty, uncomfortable, put it away and give it a go the next day. It took me about a month, but now I can go hours in the rift. There is no going back to a flat screen, for sure.

MAXF1
27-08-2018, 18:04
Brilliant advice,,wish I knew that beforehand,,they were planning an hour and a half race for me,but I had to pull out,,felt so dizzy and sick,I was gutted,,the on screen 3D graphics were fantastic,I got a full refund,,,it was £55....ye know,
But if I had pulled it off,it was worth it,,shame,

Keena
27-08-2018, 18:39
Im heading for the rift next year with my new build. Cant wait. :)

MAXF1
27-08-2018, 18:40
Ime going to have to train my brain ,

thomasjohansen
27-08-2018, 19:36
never tried VR so dont have the experience....But is the motion sickness duo to lack of g-force feel and the the brain cant cope with it or is it more the "limited" resolution/fps the VR is cable of producing?

MrTulip
27-08-2018, 20:35
never tried VR so dont have the experience....But is the motion sickness duo to lack of g-force feel and the the brain cant cope with it or is it more the "limited" resolution/fps the VR is cable of producing?

Nausea is from the lack of G-forces, but bad framerate adds to disorientation and can cause eye strain and headache. Actual resolution is not causing problems.

Keena
27-08-2018, 21:03
never tried VR so dont have the experience....But is the motion sickness duo to lack of g-force feel and the the brain cant cope with it or is it more the "limited" resolution/fps the VR is cable of producing?

Its caused by a perceived conflict between what your brain is 'seeing' and the data from the balance organs in your ear. Its why you get sea sick amongst other things. In the real world you can also experience the leans if you put your head between your knees as someone drives you around a corner, or if you are flying on instruments in cloud (Ive had that quite badly and it takes a conscious effort to trust the instrumentation).. In the outside world looking at the distant horizon will normally reduce the effect, but in VR as people suggest on here, small doses to allow your perceptions to adjust. Hope that helps.

Javaniceday
27-08-2018, 23:48
Its caused by a perceived conflict between what your brain is 'seeing' and the data from the balance organs in your ear. Its why you get sea sick amongst other things. In the real world you can also experience the leans if you put your head between your knees as someone drives you around a corner, or if you are flying on instruments in cloud (Ive had that quite badly and it takes a conscious effort to trust the instrumentation).. In the outside world looking at the distant horizon will normally reduce the effect, but in VR as people suggest on here, small doses to allow your perceptions to adjust. Hope that helps.

Right. The way I've seen it explained is that your body assumes it's been poisoned since the expected g-forces aren't felt. So it makes you throw up to get rid of the poison. So it's just a matter of training the brain that everything's okay.

Mad Al
28-08-2018, 00:48
it's the visual vs motion (inner ear) disconnect, and the G force isn't really that relevant... only time I ever felt sick was playing Lucky's Tale when I was moving the camera about too much and was feeling like my chair was drifting around the room...
edit, when I say g force isn't that relevant, it's usual slower changes of motion that cause problems

R-VR Closet
28-08-2018, 03:20
The VR sickness goes away after a while. Your brain learns that it will not experience the g-forces associated with what your eyes see when you're in the driving sim.

The trick is to drive in 5 to 10 minute intervals, little by little building up the tolerance. Don't push it - if you start to feel clammy, sweaty, uncomfortable, put it away and give it a go the next day. It took me about a month, but now I can go hours in the rift. There is no going back to a flat screen, for sure.

+1 You will train your brain not to listen to the ears saying you are not moving, and the motion sickness will go away.
I went back every day, and every day I was able to stay in a bit longer, after about a week I was cured. :triumphant:

Zeratall
28-08-2018, 04:24
Like others have said you get use to it, I use to get motion sickness, and over about a month I could play for unlimited amounts of time.

Funny thing is, since then I play with a motion rig, and the other day I turned it off and played and I instantly got motion sickness. Crazy how our bodies work.

Olijke Poffer
28-08-2018, 17:18
Motion sickness in VR is indeed caused by seeing motion with our eyes but your body does not feel the motion it expected or visa versa.
This will fool your balance organ in your ear.
It will get better over time for the most users. Keep in mind that it is not quaranteed. Some user will never get used to it.

My first VR experience was in a PSVR demonstration. I played drive club VR. Result, instand sick.
Nevertheless I felt in love with other PSVR games and bought a PSVR set. I now have a Rift and even with the game Lone Echo I do not feel motion sickness anymore. My brain has adapted.
Sometimes it still will be fooled when I sit in a car (pcars for example) and I look through a side window and put the car in reverse and hit full trottle and brake again. When I then look at an object alongside the track my brain has an error for a split second. Other than that I do experience motion sickness.

MAXF1
28-08-2018, 18:41
Thankyou everyone for explaining the motion sickness,,I don’t think I will ever be able to afford a VR rig,,but if I could I would want to crack the motion sickness,,
Yet the strangest thing aswell,,Ime a fisherman by hobbie and can fish in the worst seas ever,while everyone around is being sick,and Ime perfectly fine,yet a VR race car is not bobbing up and down on the ocean,
But yes Ime gutted I couldn’t do my 90 minutes race,,absolutely gutted,,but at least I know what I feels like to drive in 3D.
Which I will never forget,,

m00lean
30-08-2018, 14:47
Only thing I can add on this topic is that I got used to VR within 3 days. First session lasted 30 minutes until i felt sick. Like others mentioned, I took a short break and tried again. After each break I could stay longer in the cockpit and it felt more natural.

But even after 400+ hours in VR, I still feel the "falling" in my stomach when driving down the cork screw on laguna seca - which is totally awesome!

poirqc
31-08-2018, 02:36
Thankyou everyone for explaining the motion sickness,,I donít think I will ever be able to afford a VR rig,,but if I could I would want to crack the motion sickness,,
Yet the strangest thing aswell,,Ime a fisherman by hobbie and can fish in the worst seas ever,while everyone around is being sick,and Ime perfectly fine,yet a VR race car is not bobbing up and down on the ocean,
But yes Ime gutted I couldnít do my 90 minutes race,,absolutely gutted,,but at least I know what I feels like to drive in 3D.
Which I will never forget,,

That's the thing. Your body expect movements, witch don't happen. When you're fishing, the movement your body expect happends! That's why you don't get sick.

GrimeyDog
31-08-2018, 02:40
Buttkickers really help pull the VR experience together because you feel gear shifts and bumps in the seat of your pants and your hands are keyed into the motion and vibrations of the wheel.

Zeratall
31-08-2018, 02:47
Buttkickers really help pull the VR experience together because you feel gear shifts and bumps in the seat of your pants and your hands are keyed into the motion and vibrations of the wheel.

I concur, I play with a 2 dof motion rig, and my body has actually unlearn the tolerance I built to vr, I can't play without motion now lol, I really wanna add vibration for the high frequency stuff, I can feel suspension and g forces really well, but I wanna feel rpm baby lol

kofotsjanne
31-08-2018, 05:35
Driving a slow car at first might help getting into it aswell. When I first started I locked the camera to the car. I dont remember what the setting is in Pcars2 but i think its called "world movement" and thats supposed to be at 100 if im not wrong. Dont push yourself and think its going away instead drive until you feel sick and then take a break until youre fine and then try again. Try to keep as high fps as your headset allow most of the time.

justonce68
31-08-2018, 10:03
Never really had an issue with nausea and VR luckily, the only time I feel a little odd is if i have to reverse.

Johngrim
31-08-2018, 10:20
Important to lock view to horizon and also graphics and supersampling low to keep frame rate at 90fps alot of people are running silly graphics settings in vr and running at 45fps ....45fps can make you sick