Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 13 of 13

Thread: so, why do softer rollbars help in cases of one side of the car overheating?

  1. #11
    Moderator Bealdor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Leipzig
    Posts
    9,567
    Platform
    PC
    Correct. And as you already figured out, the stiffer your chassis the more effective your ARB adjustments will be.

    Here's a nice technical article that explains lateral load transfer and ARBs quite well: http://racingcardynamics.com/weight-transfer/

    @Javaniceday:
    If you adjust both ARBs in a way that the load bias stays the same, the overall balance of the car won't change. What you do change though is the responsiveness and the overall grip level of the car (to a degree).
    The higher the roll stiffness the more responsive the car will feel during direction changes. If you set it up too softly, it will feel lazy and sluggish.
    On the other hand, a too stiff ARB can take away a bit of mechanical grip and will cause the independent suspension (left-right) to become dependent again. This will take away the ability of the single wheel to compensate for road irregularities or curbs somewhat.
    You'll need to find a balance between responsiveness and mechanical grip, depending on the type of car you're driving. A high downforce LMP or Formula car needs a higher roll stiffness to keep a stable aero platform than a GT4 car for example, which almost exclusively relies on mechanical grip.
    Another side effect of stiffer ARBs is that you can get away with less static camber in your setup because of the lower amount of body roll. So everytime you make significant adjustments to your roll stiffness, make sure to check out your camber angles (tire temperature gradients) as well.
    Main Rig: CPU I7 4790K@Stock | GPU Nvidia GTX 1060 6GB | RAM 16GB DDR3 1866Mhz | MB Gigabyte GA-Z97X Gaming 3 | SSD Samsung 850 EVO 120GB | HDD Seagate SATA 1TB | O.S. Win 10 Pro 64bit | Wheel Logitech G27
    Second Rig: CPU Q6600@2,80GHz | GPU Nvidia GTX 460 1GB | RAM 4GB DDR2 800Mhz | MB ASUS P5Q SE2 | HDD WD SATA 320GB | O.S. Win 7 64bit
    STEAM ID: Bealdor

    The forum search is a powerful tool, if you know how to use it...

    Please check out our Project CARS 2 FAQ and Tips

    PCARS 1 Known Issues threads: PC / PS4 / XB1
    The following 2 users likes this Post: hkraft300, Sankyo


  2. #12
    Superkart Pilot
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Yorkshire
    Posts
    437
    Platform
    PC
    EDIT was writing this while Bealdor was also replying. We cover many of the same points.

    Quote Originally Posted by Javaniceday View Post
    This explains why stiffening front ARBs cause understeer, and stiffening rear ARBs cause oversteer. But what happens if you soften or stiffen both front and rears together? If I understand this first, I could begin to understand the overall question better.
    If you stiffen both front and rear you will get less roll. If you soften both front and rear you will get more roll.

    Quote Originally Posted by Javaniceday View Post
    IAre ARBs only about balancing the front to rear grip?
    No. They are also there to reduce roll. Reducing roll is desirable for a number of reasons.

    1) roll reduces agility, especially in a slalom/chicane type situation where the car switches from turning in one direction to turning in the opposite direction.
    2) roll uses up suspension travel. If you then drive over a bump while you are cornering you may end up hitting the bump stops which is not good for grip.
    3) Some suspension types are not good at keeping the tyre perpendicular to the road through-out the wheel's vertical travel. So when the car rolls, with some suspensions you can get positive tyre camber which reduces grip.

    Now you could reduce roll by having very stiff springs. The problem with very stiff springs is the car doesn't cope so well with bumps. Anti-roll bars allow you to reduce roll without having too stiff springs. However, the downside to very stiff anti-roll bars as if just one wheel is affected by bump, the anti-roll bar also tries to lift the other wheel, so this limits how stiff your anti-roll bars can be.
    Last edited by David Wright; 23-01-2020 at 13:17.
    The following user likes this Post: Bealdor


  3. #13
    Moderator Sankyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    8,184
    Platform
    PC
    Here's a fun video I found demonstrating how ARBs work. Especially at 5:39 when he cuts the front ARB into two parts, you then clearly see how the ARB would prevent body roll by connecting the suspension of the left and right wheels.

    CPU i7 7700K | RAM Corsair 16GB 2400MHz | GPU Asus GTX1080 Ti OC 11GB | Mobo Asus Strix Z270H | Audio SB Zx @ 5.1/AKG K401 | OS Win 10 x64 | Screen LG 27EA63V-P 27" 1920x1080 | Controllers Fanatec CSW v2.5 + UH, CSP v3, CSS SQ, CSH | Misc TrackIR 4 Pro, Playseat Revolution, DS button box

    With the right to say what you think comes the obligation to think about what you say.
    I'd rather have questions that cannot be answered than answers that cannot be questioned - Richard Feynman
    Teach how to think, not what to think

Similar Threads

  1. Overheating
    By ImpliedConsent in forum The Garage - Car Setup Talk
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22-11-2017, 00:16
  2. Greener on the other side?
    By G-Funk in forum Project CARS on Playstation 4
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 14-12-2015, 07:56
  3. Right side wheel or left side wheel
    By Rodrigoef in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-09-2015, 13:05
  4. Wheel Pulls Violently Side to Side - Windows 10
    By dibbdroid in forum PC - Technical Help & Support
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-08-2015, 06:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •